Baud Lab

Baud LabBaud Lab

Systems Biology

Baud Lab
Social and host-microbiome systems
Group leader

Baud Lab

Social and host-microbiome systems
Group leader

From September 2021 Group Leader, Centre for Genomic Regulation.
2015-2021 Sir Henry Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellow, European Bioinformatics Institute (Cambridge, UK) and University of California San Diego (San Diego, USA).
2013-2015 EMBL Interdisciplinary Postdoctoral Fellow, European Bioinformatics Institute (Cambridge, UK) and EMBL Rome (Rome, Italy).
2009-2013 PhD, Wellcome Trust doctoral training programme in Genomic Medicine and Statistics, University of Oxford (Oxford, UK).
2005-2009 Bachelor’s degree in Biology and Master’s degree in Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, Ecole Normale Superieure (Cachan, France) and Universite Paris XI (Orsay, France).

Job openings

We will soon start recruiting a PhD student, a postdoctoral researcher and a technician to start in the lab in or shortly after September 2021.
Positions will be announced on the Job Opportunities section. Stay tuned!
For any enquiries please contact abaud@ebi.ac.uk

Summary

How do social partners and the gut microbiome influence health and disease? To address this question, we leverage the fact that many characteristics of social partners and the gut microbiome can be predicted from the genes of social partners and the genes of the gut microbiome, respectively. Thus, instead of trying to measure all the traits of social partners and/or the microbiome that might influence a phenotype of interest, we simply sequence the genes of social partners and/or the genes of the microbiome and model the effect of those genes on the phenotype of interest, measured in focal individuals (Figure 1).

Our laboratory primarily uses laboratory rodents as models but, in the future, we will also investigate indirect genetic effects in humans (e.g. indirect genetic effects from roommates and spouses). Projects in the lab can be purely computational or a combination of experimental and computational work. We have many established collaborations with researchers in Europe and the UK, and in the US.

 

Figure 1. We can study the influence of social partners by sequencing the genes of social partners and modelling their (indirect) effect on the phenotype of interest.

 

Figure 2. We use genomic technologies and genetic models to dissect the influence of social partners and the gut microbiome on health and disease.