You are here

    • You are here:
    • Home > New research reveals how the genes in our brain change with what we eat

New research reveals how the genes in our brain change with what we eat

New research reveals how the genes in our brain change with what we eat

28
Feb
Thu, 28/02/2019 - 00:00

New research reveals how the genes in our brain change with what we eat

The study shows that small changes in the expression of many genes correlate with physical and behavioural changes in the mice

EN ESPAÑOL - EN CATALÀ

  • The study shows that small changes in the expression of many genes correlate with physical and behavioural changes in the mice
  • This gives clues about how an obesogenic environment can produce behavioural as well as physical alterations that lead to obesity

Obesity is not just a matter of metabolism. Your behaviour changes and even knowing the unhealthy effects of high fat/high energy diet you cannot stop consuming it. Now scientists at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona have found out how our genes respond to the foods we eat. They fed mice an obesogenic diet and found that it triggers coordinated gene expression changes in different areas of the brain. Their work, published in the journal eNeuro, shows that small changes in the expression of many genes correlate with physical and behavioural changes in the mice, giving clues about how an obesogenic environment can produce behavioural as well as physical alterations that lead to obesity.

Obesity is a growing problem across the world - in 2016, more than 1.9 billion adults 18 years and over were overweight, and of these, over 650 million were obese. In the USA, experts predict over 85 per cent of adults will be overweight or obese by 2030. Obesity greatly increases the risk of developing other chronic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, heart and circulatory disease, depression, certain cancers and dying earlier.

CRG researchers Ilario De Toma, Marta Fructuoso and Mara Dierssen in collaboration with Bartek Wilczynski from the University of Warsaw, studied how gene expression changes in certain brain regions associated with energy balance and reward when animals eat so-called ‘obesogenic’ diets. They believed this work would reveal why mice become overweight and overeat when they have free access to a chocolate diet. Until now, we knew little about how this diet leads to gene expression changes in the brain and how these changes are coordinated.

In their research, they studied gene expression changes in mice which have access to an energy-dense diet. Mice fed the high-energy diet became overweight and compulsive, mimicking what happens as obesity develops in humans. They discovered that the observed gene expression changes are controlled by two main regulatory processes – one molecular ‘switch-like’ process that leads to changes greater than 1.5-fold in a limited number of genes, and another ‘fine tuning’ process which controls genes using a subtler process. Surprisingly, the subtlest molecular changes were the ones associated with body weight and compulsivity.

“We found that genes responding to diet in a similar way were not randomly distributed but tended to cluster in the same region of the genome called topologically associated domains, or TADs” explains Dierssen. “TADs are areas of the chromosome that are evolutionarily conserved across tissues and species, and the genes present in TADs usually exhibit similar expression profiles, forming clusters that are regulated together. In fact, it is not just homeostatic mechanisms regulating food intake and energy expenditure that control obesity development, but also by reward, emotion and memory, attention, and cognitive systems that may lead to addictive-like behaviours such as compulsive-overeating and inflexibility. These are controlled by metabolic and hedonic brain areas - the hypothalamus, the frontal cortex and the striatum – and these needs to be coordinated to allow people to ingest a higher more calories than they need”, concludes Dierssen.

In their study, the team discovered that how the genes within TADs responded to diet depended on the brain region. For example, the same domain could contain mainly upregulated genes in the striatum and cortex, and downregulated genes in the hypothalamus.

“We did expect gene expression to go awry when animals eat an obesogenic diet. But we did not expect the genes linked to body weight to increase, and for inflexible and compulsive behaviours to be only subtly regulated,” Dierssen continues. “We found the genes that correlated with behavioural or physical changes that we see only went moderately up or down as a result of the chocolate diet, whilst other genes changed their levels more,” says Dierssen. “It was really exciting to find the physical and behavioural changes being reflected by the genes changing in the brain area controlling those functions. For example, gene changes in the hypothalamus, which controls appetite and body weight, correlated with body weight of the mice, while levels of genes expressed in the striatum and frontal cortex correlated with the degree of compulsivity, inflexibility and overeating.”

The research suggests that the gene expression changes induced by a highly palatable and energy-dense diet across different brain regions are orchestrated by chromosomal domains, which allows a coordinated and region-specific response across different brain regions. The fact those genes cluster together in three-dimensional domains suggests epigenetic therapy could be very important, and needs to affect gene expression in a specific 3D region of the genome. We need treatments for obesity that tackle a whole network of genes belonging to key biological processes, rather than a single gene.

The team are now searching for ways to reverse addictive behaviours such as compulsivity and inflexibility by rescuing incorrect gene expression. Research like this, that gives insights into molecular mechanisms underlying conditions, is needed to identify new ways to treat the growing number of people affected by obesity around the world.

For more information and interviews, please, contact: Gloria Lligadas, Head of Communications & PR, Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) – gloria.lligadas@crg.eu – Tel. +34 933160153 – Mobile +34608550788

Funding information: Research leading to these results has been supported by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (Severo Ochoa 2013-2017' SAF2013-49129-C2-1-R and SAF2016-79956-R), Marie Curie IMPULSE, the Centre for Industrial Technological Development (CDTI) Smartfoods, Era-net-Neuron (PCIN-2013- 060) and the Polish National Center for Research and Development (Era-net-Neuron/10/2013).

Reference: Research in this press release is based on findings published in the following academic paper:

I De Toma, I., Grabowicz, I.E., Fructuoso, M., Trujillano, D., Wilczynski, B., Dierssen, M. Overweighed mice show coordinated homeostatic and hedonic transcriptional response across brain.  eNeuro (2018). DOI: 10.1523/ENEURO.0287-18.2018 http://www.eneuro.org/content/eneuro/early/2018/11/22/ENEURO.0287-18.2018.full.pdf 


EN ESPAÑOL

Una nueva investigación desvela cómo los genes de nuestro cerebro cambian con los alimentos que ingerimos

  • El estudio muestra que pequeños cambios en la expresión de muchos genes se correlacionan con cambios físicos y de comportamiento en ratones
  • Esto proporciona pistas sobre cómo un entorno obesógeno puede producir cambios de comportamiento y también alteraciones físicas que conducen a la obesidad

La obesidad no es sólo cuestión de metabolismo. Tu conducta cambia y, a pesar de conocer los efectos perniciosos de una dieta altamente rica en grasas/energía, no puedes parar de consumirla. Ahora, un equipo científico del Centro de Regulación Genómica (CRG) en Barcelona ha descubierto cómo nuestros genes responden a los alimentos que ingerimos. El equipo alimentó ratones con una dieta obesógena y descubrió que esto desencadena cambios coordinados de la expresión de los genes en diferentes áreas del cerebro. Su estudio, publicado en la revista eNeuro, muestra que pequeños cambios en la expresión de muchos genes se correlacionan con cambios físicos y de comportamiento en los ratones, y ello proporciona pistas sobre cómo un entorno obesógeno puede producir cambios de comportamiento y también alteraciones físicas que conducen a la obesidad.

La obesidad es un problema creciente en todo el mundo – en 2016, más de 1.900 millones de adultos de 18 años y mayores tenían sobrepeso y, de ellos, más de 650 millones era obesos. En EEUU, los expertos predicen que más del 85 por ciento de los adultos tendrán sobrepeso o serán obesos en 2030. La obesidad incrementa sustancialmente el riesgo de desarrollar otras enfermedades crónicas, incluidas la diabetes tipo 2, enfermedades cardíacas y circulatorias, depresión, algunos cánceres y muertes prematuras.

Los/as investigadores/as del CRG Ilario de Toma, Marta Fructuoso y Mara Dierssen, en colaboración con Bartek Wilczynski, de la Universidad de Varsovia, estudiaron cómo la expresión génica cambia en ciertas regiones del cerebro asociadas con el equilibrio de energía y recompensa cuando los animales ingerían las llamadas dietas ‘obesógenas’. Creían que este trabajo les desvelaría por qué los ratones acababan teniendo sobrepeso o comiendo demasiado cuando tienen acceso libre a una dieta de chocolate. Hasta ahora, se sabía muy poco sobre cómo esta dieta conduce a cambios en la expresión génica en el cerebro y cómo se coordinan estos cambios.

En su investigación, estudiaron los cambios en la expresión génica de los ratones que tenían acceso a una dieta rica en energía. Los ratones a los que se suministraba esta dieta acabaron con sobrepeso y con conductas compulsivas, de manera similar a cómo la obesidad se desarrolla en humanos.  Descubrieron que los cambios en la expresión génica observados están controlados por dos procesos regulatorios principales – un proceso molecular similar a un ‘interruptor’ da lugar a una desregulación superior a 1,5 veces de la expresión génica en un número limitado de genes, y otro proceso de ‘sintonización’ que controla los genes mediante un proceso más sutil. Sorprendentemente, los cambios moleculares más sutiles fueron los asociados a peso corporal y a conductas compulsivas.

“Descubrimos que los genes que respondían a la dieta de manera similar no estaban distribuidos al azar, sino que tendían a agruparse en la misma región del genoma, denominada ‘dominios topológicamente asociados’ or TADs, en sus siglas en inglés” explica Dierssen. “Los TADs son áreas del cromosoma que se han conservado evolutivamente en tejidos y especies, y los genes presentes en TADs usualmente muestran perfiles de expresión similares, formando agrupaciones que están reguladas conjuntamente. De hecho, no son solo los mecanismos homeostáticos que regulan la ingestión de alimentos y el gasto de energía los que controlan el desarrollo de la obesidad. La recompensa, la emoción y la memoria, la atención y los sistemas cognitivos también pueden conducir a conductas adictivas como comer compulsivamente y la inflexibilidad. Todo ello está controlado por las áreas metabólicas y hedónicas del cerebro – el hipotálamo, el córtex frontal y el estriado – y es necesario que todo esté coordinado para permitir que las personas ingieran muchas más calorías de las que necesitan”, concluye Dierssen  

En su estudio, el equipo descubrió que la forma en que los genes en los TADs respondían a la dieta dependía de la región del cerebro. Por ejemplo, el mismo dominio podía contener principalmente una concentración de genes en el estriado y el córtex, y una disminución de genes en el hipotálamo.

“Esperábamos que la expresión génica se desviara cuando los animales ingerían una dieta obesógena. Pero no esperábamos que los genes asociados al peso corporal aumentaran, y que para las conductas inflexibles y compulsivas sólo estuvieran sutilmente representados,” continua Dierssen. “Descubrimos que los genes que vemos que se correlacionaban con cambios físicos o de conducta sólo aumentaron o disminuyeron moderadamente como resultado de la dieta de chocolate, mientras que en otros genes sus niveles cambiaron más,” dice Dierssen. “Fue realmente emocionante ver los cambios físicos y de conducta reflejados por los genes cambiar en el área del cerebro que controla estas funciones. Por ejemplo, los cambios de los genes en el hipotálamo, que controla el apetito y el peso corporal, se correlacionaban con el peso corporal de los ratones, mientras que los niveles de genes expresados en el estriado y el córtex frontal, se correlacionaban con el grado de conducta compulsiva, inflexibilidad y comer demasiado.”

La investigación sugiere que los cambios en la expresión génica inducidos por una dieta altamente sabrosa y rica en energía en las diferentes regiones del cerebro están organizados por dominios cromosómicos, lo que permite una respuesta coordinada y dirigida a una región específica entre las diferentes áreas cerebrales. El hecho de que esos genes se agrupen en dominios tridimensionales sugiere que la terapia epigenética podría ser muy importante, y que debería incidir en la expresión génica en una región 3D específica del genoma. Son necesarios tratamientos para la obesidad que aborden una red completa de genes que pertenecen a procesos biológicos clave, en lugar de abordar un solo gen.

El equipo se centra ahora en buscar nuevas vías para revertir las conductas adictivas, como la compulsiva y la inflexibilidad, mediante el rescate de expresiones génicas incorrectas. Trabajos como este, que permiten comprender mejor los mecanismos moleculares subyacentes en las enfermedades, son necesarios para identificar nuevas vías para el tratamiento del creciente número de personas afectadas por la obesidad en todo el mundo.

Para más información y entrevistas, por favor, contactad a: Gloria Lligadas, Directora de Comunicación y RRPP, Centro de Regulación Genómica (CRG) - gloria.lligadas@crg.eu – Tel. +34 933160153 – Móvil +34608550788

Información sobre la financiación de este estudio: La investigación que ha producido estos resultados ha recibido el apoyo del Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad (Severo Ochoa 2013-2017' SAF2013-49129-C2-1-R y SAF2016-79956-R), Marie Curie IMPULSE, el Centro para el Desarrollo Tecnológico Industrial (CDTI) Smartfoods, Era-net-Neuron (PCIN-2013- 060), y el Centro Nacional de Investigación y Desarrollo de Polonia (Era-net-Neuron/10/2013).

Referencia: El estudio descrito en esta nota de prensa está basado en descubrimientos publicados en la siguiente publicación académica:

I De Toma, I., Grabowicz, I.E., Fructuoso, M., Trujillano, D., Wilczynski, B., Dierssen, M. Overweighed mice show coordinated homeostatic and hedonic transcriptional response across brain.  eNeuro (2018). DOI: 10.1523/ENEURO.0287-18.2018 http://www.eneuro.org/content/eneuro/early/2018/11/22/ENEURO.0287-18.2018.full.pdf


EN CATALÀ

Una nova recerca mostra com els gens del nostre cervell canvien amb els aliments que ingerim

  • L’estudi mostra que petits canvis en l’expressió de molts gens es correlacionen amb canvis físics i de comportament
  • Això proporciona pistes sobre com un entorn obesogen pot produir canvis de comportament i també alteracions físiques que condueixen a l’obesitat

L’obesitat no només és qüestió de metabolisme. La teva conducta canvia i, tot i conèixer els efectes perniciosos d’una dieta altament rica en greixos/energia, no pots parar de consumir-la. Ara, un equip científic del Centre de Regulació Genòmica (CRG) a Barcelona ha descobert com els nostres gens responen als aliments que ingerim. L’equip va alimentar ratolins amb una dieta obesògena i va descobrir que això desencadena canvis coordinats de l’expressió dels gens en diferents àrees del cervell. El seu estudi, publicat a la revista eNeuro, mostra que petits canvis en l’expressió de molts gens es correlacionen amb canvis físics i de comportament en els ratolins, i això proporciona pistes sobre com un entorn obesogen pot produir canvis de comportament i també alteracions físiques que condueixen a l’obesitat.

L’obesitat és un problema creixent a tot el món – al 2016, més de 1.900 milions d’adults de 18 anys i més grans tenien sobrepès i, d’aquests, més de 650 milions eren obesos. Als EUA, els experts prediuen que més del 85 per cent dels adults tindran sobrepès o seran obesos al 2030. L’obesitat incrementa substancialment el risc de desenvolupar d’altres malalties cròniques, incloses la diabetis tipus 2, malalties cardíaques i circulatòries, depressió, alguns càncers i morts prematures.

Els/les investigadors/es del CRG Ilario de Toma, Marta Fructuoso i Mara Dierssen, en col·laboració amb en Bartek Wilczynski, de la Universitat de Varsòvia, estudiaren com l’expressió gènica canvia en certes regions del cervell associades amb l’equilibri d’energia i recompensa quan els animals ingerien les anomenades dietes ‘obesògenes’. Creien que aquest treball els desvetllaria per què els ratolins acabaven tenint sobrepès o menjant massa quan tenen accés lliure a una dieta de xocolata. Fins ara, se sabia molt poc sobre com aquesta dieta condueix a canvis en l’expressió gènica en el cervell i com aquests canvis es coordinen.

En la seva recerca, estudiaren els canvis en l’expressió gènica dels ratolins que tenien accés a una dieta rica en energia. Els ratolins a qui se subministrava aquesta dieta acabaren amb sobreprès i amb conductes compulsives, de manera similar a com l’obesitat es desenvolupa en humans. Descobriren que els canvis en l’expressió gènica observats estan controlats per dos processos reguladors principals – un procés molecular similar a un ‘interruptor’ que dóna lloc a una desregulació superior a 1,5 vegades de la expressió gènica en un nombre limitat de gens, i un altre procés de ‘sintonització’ que controla els gens mitjançant un procés més subtil. Sorprenentment, els canvis moleculars més subtils foren els associats a pes corporal i a conductes compulsives.

“Descobrírem que els gens que responien a la dieta de manera similar no estaven distribuïts a l’atzar, sinó que tendien a agrupar-se en la mateixa regió del genoma, denominada ‘dominis topològicament associats’ or TADs, en les seves sigles en anglès” explica Dierssen. “Els TADs són àrees del cromosoma que s’han conservat evolutivament en teixits i espècies, i els gens presents en TADs usualment mostren perfils d’expressió similars, formant agrupacions que estan regulades conjuntament. De fet, no són només els mecanismes homeostàtics que regulen la ingestió d’aliments i el consum d’energia els que controlen el desenvolupament de l’obesitat. La recompensa, l’emoció i la memòria, l’atenció i els sistemes cognitius també poden conduir a conductes addictives com ara menjar compulsivament i la inflexibilitat. Tot això està controlat per les àrees metabòliques i hedòniques del cervell – l’hipotàlem, el còrtex frontal i l’estriat – i és necessari que tot estigui coordinat per permetre que les persones ingereixin més calories de les que necessiten”, conclou Dierssen.

En el seu estudi, l’equip descobrí que la manera en què els gens als TADs responien a la dieta depenia de la regió del cervell. Per exemple, el mateix domini podia contenir principalment un augment en la concentració de gens a l’estriat i el còrtex, i una disminució de gens a l’hipotàlem.

“Esperàvem que l’expressió gènica es desviés quan els animals ingerien una dieta obesògena. Però no esperàvem que els gens associats al pes corporal augmentessin, i que per a les conductes inflexibles i compulsives només estiguessin subtilment representats,” continua Dierssen. “Descobrírem que els gens que veiem que es correlacionaven amb canvis físics o de conducta només augmentaren o disminuïren moderadament com a resultat de la dieta de xocolata, mentre que en d’altres gens els seus nivells canviaren més,” diu Dierssen. “Fou realment emocionant veure els canvis físics i de conducta reflectits pels gens canviar en l’àrea del cervell que controla aquestes funcions. Per exemple, els canvis dels gens a l’hipotàlem, que controla la gana i el pes corporal, es correlacionaven amb el pes corporal dels ratolins, mentre que els nivells de gens expressats a l’estriat i el còrtex frontal, es correlacionaven amb el grau de conducta compulsiva, inflexibilitat i menjar massa.”

La recerca suggereix que els canvis en l’expressió gènica induïts per una dieta altament saborosa i rica en energia en les diferents regions del cervell estan organitzats per dominis cromosòmics, fet que permet una resposta coordinada i dirigida a una regió específica entre les diferents àrees cerebrals. El fet que aquests gens s’agrupin en dominis tridimensionals suggereix que la teràpia epigenètica podria ser molt important, i que hauria d’incidir en l’expressió gènica en una regió 3D específica del genoma. Són necessaris tractaments per a l’obesitat que abordin una xarxa completa de gens que pertanyen a processos biològics clau, enlloc d’abordar un sol gen.

L’equip se centra ara en cercar noves vies per a revertir les conductes addictives, com la compulsiva i la inflexibilitat, mitjançant el rescat d’expressions gèniques incorrectes. Treballs com aquest, que permeten comprendre millor els mecanismes moleculars subjacents en les malalties, són necessaris per identificar noves vies per al tractament del creixent nombre de persones afectades per l’obesitat en tot el món.

Para a més informació i entrevistes, si us plau contacteu a: Glòria Lligadas, Directora de Comunicació i Relacions Públiques, Centre de Regulació Genòmica (CRG) - gloria.lligadas@crg.eu – Tel. +34 93 316 01 53 – Mòbil +34 608 550 788

Informació sobre el finançament d’aquest estudi: La recerca que ha produït aquests resultats ha rebut el suport del Ministeri d’Economia i Competitivitat (Severo Ochoa 2013-2017' SAF2013-49129-C2-1-R i SAF2016-79956-R), Marie Curie IMPULSE, el Centro para el Desarrollo Tecnológico Industrial (CDTI) Smartfoods, Era-net-Neuron (PCIN-2013- 060), i el Centre Nacional d’Investigació i Desenvolupament de Polònia (Era-net-Neuron/10/2013).

Referència: L’estudi descrit en aquesta nota de premsa està basat en descobriments publicats en la següent publicació acadèmica:

I De Toma, I., Grabowicz, I.E., Fructuoso, M., Trujillano, D., Wilczynski, B., Dierssen, M. Overweighed mice show coordinated homeostatic and hedonic transcriptional response across brain.  eNeuro (2018). DOI: 10.1523/ENEURO.0287-18.2018 http://www.eneuro.org/content/eneuro/early/2018/11/22/ENEURO.0287-18.2018.full.pdf