You are here

    • You are here:
    • Home > CNAG-CRG joins forces with US institutions to set up new genome imaging centre at Harvard

CNAG-CRG joins forces with US institutions to set up new genome imaging centre at Harvard

NewsNEWS

31
Aug
Tue, 31/08/2021 - 10:25

CNAG-CRG joins forces with US institutions to set up new genome imaging centre at Harvard

Three-dimensional nuclear reconstruction of a PGP1 genome based on OligoFISSEQ data.

Three-dimensional nuclear reconstruction of a PGP1 genome based on OligoFISSEQ data.

EN ESPAÑOL | EN CATALÀ

Summary:

  • An $11.2-million five-year National Institutes of Health grant funds the new Center for Genome Imaging at Harvard Medical School in collaboration with Brown University, Baylor College of Medicine and the CNAG-CRG, part of the CRG
  • Effort will develop technologies that enable imaging, analysis, modeling of entire human genome in 3D and at extremely high resolution
  • Imaging of the entire genome rather than only separate sections of it is critical for elucidating its function in disease and health
  • Research to explore how changes in DNA sequences, chromosome breakage may precipitate disease

The Centro Nacional de Análisis Genómico (CNAG-CRG), part of the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona, will be part of the Center for Genome Imaging, a new infrastructure based at Harvard University that will develop technologies that enable the imaging, analysis and modeling of the entire human genome in 3D and at extremely high resolution. The transatlantic collaboration is an important step towards the ultimate goal of visualising the entire human genome at super-resolution.

Together with Ting Wu at Harvard Medical School, Nicola Neretti at Brown University and Erez Lieberman Aiden at Baylor College of Medicine, Marc A. Marti-Renom has received a $11.2-million, five-year grant from the U.S National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) to set up the centre. Half of the funding from the grant, which runs through March 2026, will go to Harvard Medical School, with the rest divided among the three other groups.

“We are very excited to be part of the new CGI Center. With the funds from the CEGS program of the NIH, which are very rarely granted to non-US groups, we will be able to further develop and innovate our computational methods to address the outstanding challenge of seeing the entire human genome in its natural confinement.”, says ICREA Research Professor Marc A. Marti-Renom, and Group Leader of the Structural Genomics lab with joint affiliation at the CNAG-CRG and the CRG.

A better understanding of the detailed structure, mechanism, and function of the human genome can illuminate biological mysteries about genetic function and yield important clues about the origins of genetic changes that give rise to dysfunction and disease. Such detailed understanding begins with the ability to see the entire genome in super-resolution at a maximum close-up.

The structure of the genome is central to everything from the proper formation of sperm and egg to replication, cell division, and development from embryo to adulthood. Every healthy cell contains a maternal and a paternal copy of the genome. The ability to observe how they fold and package themselves during these biological events, and how those processes can go awry, could open new windows on how certain genetic diseases arise.

Current technologies for observing the genome at super-resolution and in a sequence-specific fashion are limited because they can practically observe no more than a handful of genes or, at best, a mere 1 percent of the genome at a time. According to Wu, this is a problem because genomic responses to disease or to developmental cues, such as those occurring during embryo formation and development, can involve hundreds to thousands of genes scattered across the entire genome.

Super-resolution imaging can reveal new worlds of activity within the genome. For example, super-resolution images can reveal how errors in cell division can lead to egg or sperm that contain too many or too few chromosomes, or cause chromosome breakage, which can cause genetic disease or cancer.

Certain viruses, notably HIV, infect humans by inserting themselves into breaks they create in the genome. Super-resolution images can clarify what happens to the structure of genomic regions when they are broken and pave the way to new treatments.

Super-resolution imaging could also yield insights about repetitive sequences of DNA, which constitute nearly half of the genome but whose precise role remains somewhat murky.  The number, arrangement, and packaging of these repeats have been linked to genetic disease, so knowing how they are organized could help researchers better understand the molecular origins of such diseases.

Each of the research groups at the four institutions offers a unique and complementary area of expertise, ranging from genetics and genomics to chromosome mechanics, imaging at super-resolution, polymer-based, physics-based as well as restraint-based modeling, among others.

Over the past few years, the four laboratories have been developing super-resolution imaging technologies and computational methods, such as OligoFISSEQ, a new method for mapping genomes described by Marti-Renom and Wu last year in Nature Methods (link to CRG’s news article from last year about the method). The ultimate goal is to visualize the entire human genome at super-resolution.

About CNAG-CRG

The Centro Nacional de Análisis Genómico is one of the largest European centers in terms of sequencing capacity. It was created in 2009 with the mission to carry out projects in nucleic acid analysis in collaboration with the national and international research community. It is a non-profit organization funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, and the Catalan Government through the Economy and Knowledge Department and the Health Department. Since 2015 it is part of the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG).

The center focuses on sequencing and analysis projects in areas such as cancer genetics, rare disorders, host-pathogen interactions, de novo assembly and genome annotation, evolutionary studies and improvement of species of agricultural interest, in collaboration with universities, hospitals, research centers and companies in the sector of biotechnology and pharma.

About the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG)

The CRG is a biomedical research center based in Barcelona. Created in December 2000, the CRG is home to more than four hundred interdisciplinary scientists focused on understanding the complexity of life, from the genome to the cell and the entire organism. The CRG is a center with a unique research model, focused on recruiting internationally renowned group leaders. The CRG is a member of the Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST) and a CERCA centre within the research system of the Catalan Government.

Funding information

The fudning comes from the Centers of Excellence in Genomic Science (CEGS) program, which supports the formation of multi-investigator, interdisciplinary research teams to develop novel and innovative genomic research projects, using the data sets and technologies developed by the Human Genome Project. The CEGS program is run by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), an institute that is part of the United States of America’s National Institutes of Health (NIH). A list of active CEGS awards can be found here, including more information about the Center for Genome Imaging.


EN ESPAÑOL

El CNAG-CRG une esfuerzos con instituciones de EEUU para establecer un nuevo centro de visualización del genoma en Harvard

Resumen:

  • Una ayuda de cinco años de duración dotada con 11,2 M$ por los Institutos Nacionales de Salud (NIH, por sus siglas en inglés) de EEUU financiará el nuevo Centro para la Visualización del Genoma en la Harvard Medical School, en colaboración con la Brown University, el Baylor College of Medicine y el CNAG-CRG, parte del CRG
  • El objetivo es el desarrollo de tecnologías de imágenes, análisis, modelaje del genoma humano completo en 3D a una resolución increíblemente alta
  • La visualización del genoma completo en lugar de por secciones separadas es crítica para dilucidar su función en la salud y en la enfermedad
  • La investigación se centrará en explorar cómo los cambios en las secuencias de ADN, o los daños cromosómicos pueden precipitar la enfermedad

El Centro Nacional de Análisis Genómico (CNAG-CRG), parte del Centro de Regulación Genómica (CRG), en Barcelona, formará parte del Centro para la Visualización del Genoma, una nueva infraestructura ubicada en la Universidad de Harvard que desarrollará tecnologías que permitirán la visualización, el análisis y el modelaje del genoma humano completo a una resolución increíblemente alta. La colaboración transatlántica es un importante paso hacia el objetivo último de visualizar el genoma humano completo a superresolución.

Junto a Ting Wu en la Harvard Medical School, Nicola Neretti de la Brown University y Erez Lieberman Aiden del Baylor College of Medicine, Marc A. Marti-Renom ha recibido 11,2 millones de dólares, a través de una ayuda de cinco años de duración concedido por los Institutos Nacionales de Salud (NIH) de EEUU para crear el centro. La mitad de los fondos de la ayuda, que durará hasta marzo de 2026, se destinará a la Harvard Medical School, y el resto se dividirá entre los otros tres grupos.

“Estamos entusiasmados de ser parte del nuevo Centro. Con los fondos del programa de Centros de Excelencia en Ciencias Genómicas (CEGS, por sus siglas en inglés) del NIH, que raramente se conceden a grupos de fuera de EEUU, seremos capaces de desarrollar e innovar más nuestros métodos computacionales para abordar el excepcional reto de visualizar el genoma humano completo en su entorno natural”, dice el profesor de investigación ICREA Marc A. Marti-Renom, y jefe del grupo de Genómica Estructural con afiliación conjunta en el CNAG-CRG y el CRG.

Una mejor comprensión de la estructura, el mecanismo y la función en detalle del genoma humano puede esclarecer misterios biológicos sobre la función genética y revelar importantes pistas sobre los orígenes de los cambios genéticos que dan lugar a las disfunciones y las enfermedades. Una comprensión tan detallada comienza con la posibilidad de visualizar el genoma completo en superresolución.

La estructura del genoma es el epicentro de todo, desde la formación adecuada del esperma y el óvulo a la replicación, la división celular, y el desarrollo desde el embrión a la edad adulta. Cada célula sana contiene una copia materna y una paterna del genoma. La posibilidad de observar cómo se pliegan y empaquetan durante estos eventos biológicos, y cómo estos procesos pueden torcerse, podrían abrir nuevas vías para descubrir cómo surgen ciertas enfermedades genéticas.

Las tecnologías actuales para observar el genoma en superresolución y de manera secuencial y específica están limitadas porque sólo pueden observar prácticamente un puñado de genes o, como mucho, un mero 1 por ciento del genoma a la vez. Según Wu, esto es un problema porque las respuestas genómicas a la enfermedad o a pautas del desarrollo, como las que ocurren durante la formación del embrión y el desarrollo, pueden implicar de cientos a miles de genes dispersos por todo el genoma.

La superresolución puede revelar nuevos mundos de actividad en el genoma. Por ejemplo, las imágenes de superresolución pueden desvelar cómo errores en la división celular pueden resultar en óvulos o esperma que contienen muy pocos o demasiados cromosomas, o causar daños cromosómicos, que pueden provocar enfermedades genéticas o cáncer.

Ciertos virus, especialmente el VIH, infectan a los humanos insertándose en fracturas que crean en el genoma. Las imágenes de superresolución pueden clarificar qué ocurre a la estructura de las regiones genómicas cuando se fracturan y allanar el camino a nuevos tratamientos.

La superresolución también podría producir conocimientos sobre secuencias repetitivas de ADN, las cuales constituyen cerca de la mitad del genoma, a pesar de que su rol preciso permanece un poco nebuloso. El número, la disposición y el empaquetamiento de estas secuencias repetitivas han sido relacionadas con las enfermedades genéticas, así que conocer cómo están organizadas podría ayudar a los investigadores a conocer mejor los orígenes moleculares de dichas enfermedades.

Cada uno de los grupos de investigación en las cuatro instituciones participantes ofrece un área de especialización única y complementaria, que va desde la genética y la genómica a la mecánica cromosómica, la visualización por superresolución, y el modelaje tridimensional, entre otros.

En los últimos años, los cuatro laboratorios han estado desarrollando tecnologías de visualización por superresolución y métodos computacionales, tales como el OligoFISSEQ, un nuevo método para cartografiar genomas descrito por Marti-Renom y Wu el pasado año en Nature Methods (enlace a la noticia del CRG del pasado año sobre el método). El fin último es visualizar el genoma humano completo a superresolución.

Sobre el CNAG-CRG

El Centro Nacional de Análisis Genómico es uno de los mayores centros europeos en términos de capacidad de secuenciación. Se creó en 2009 con la misión de llevar a cabo proyectos sobre análisis de ácido nucleico en colaboración con la comunidad científica nacional e internacional. Es una organización sin ánimo de lucro financiada por el Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, y la Generalitat de Catalunya a través del Departamento de Investigación y Universidades y el Departamento de Salud. Desde 2015 es parte del Centro de Regulación Genómica (CRG).

El centro se enfoca en proyectos de secuenciación y análisis en áreas como la genética del cáncer, las enfermedades raras, interacciones huésped-patógeno, el ensamblaje de novo y la anotación genómica, estudios evolutivos y mejora de especies de interés agrícola, en colaboración con universidades, hospitales, centros de investigación y empresas del sector biotecnológico y farmacéutico.

Sobre el Centro de Regulación Genómica (CRG)

El CRG es un centro de investigación biomédica ubicado en Barcelona. Creado en diciembre de 2000, el CRG acoge a un equipo científico interdisciplinar de más de cuatrocientas personas centradas en comprender la complejidad de la vida, desde el genoma a la célula y un organismo completo. El CRG es un centro con un modelo de investigación único, focalizado en reclutar internacionalmente líderes de grupo de prestigio. El CRG es miembro del Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST) y es un centro CERCA del sistema de investigación de la Generalitat de Catalunya.

Financiación

La financiación procede del programa Centers of Excellence in Genomic Science (CEGS), que apoya la formación de equipos de investigación interdisciplinar y con múltiples investigadores para desarrollar proyectos de investigación genómica novedosos e innovadores, usando los conjuntos de datos y las tecnologías desarrolladas por el Proyecto Genoma Humano. El programa CEGS está gestionado por el National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI, por sus siglas en inglés), que es parte de los Institutos Nacionales de Salud de EEUU (NIH). La lista de las ayudas concedidas por el CEGS puede consultarse aquí, incluida más información sobre el Centro para la Visualización del Genoma.


EN CATALÀ

El CNAG-CRG uneix esforços amb institucions d’EUA per a establir un nou centre de visualització del genoma a Harvard

Resum:

  • Un ajut de cinc anys de duració dotat amb 11,2 M$ pels Instituts Nacionals de Salut (NIH, per les seves sigles en anglès) d’EUA finançarà el nou Centre per a la Visualització del Genoma a la Harvard Medical School, en col·laboració amb la Brown University, el Baylor College of Medicine i el CNAG-CRG, part del CRG
  • L’objectiu és el desenvolupament de tecnologies d’imatges, anàlisi, modelatge del genoma humà complet en 3D a una resolució increïblement alta
  • La visualització del genoma complet en lloc de per seccions separades és crítica per a dilucidar la seva funció en la salut i en la malaltia
  • La recerca se centrarà en explorar com els canvis en les seqüències d’ADN, o els danys cromosòmics poden precipitar la malaltia

El Centre Nacional d’Anàlisi Genòmica (CNAG-CRG), part del Centre de Regulació Genòmica (CRG), a Barcelona, formarà part del Centre per a la Visualització del Genoma, una nova infraestructura ubicada a la Universitat de Harvard que desenvoluparà tecnologies que permetran la visualització, l’anàlisi i el modelatge del genoma humà complet a una resolució increïblement alta. La col·laboració transatlàntica és un important pas cap a l’objectiu últim de visualitzar el genoma humà complet a superresolució.

Juntament amb Ting Wu a la Harvard Medical School, Nicola Neretti de la Brown University i Erez Lieberman Aiden del Baylor College of Medicine, Marc A. Marti-Renom ha rebut 11,2 milions de dòlars, a través d’un ajut de cinc anys de duració concedit pels Instituts Nacionals de Salut d’EUA (NIH) d’EUA per a crear el centre. La meitat dels fons de l’ajut, que durarà fins al març de 2026, es destinarà a la Harvard Medical School, i la resta es dividirà entre els altres tres grups.

“Estem entusiasmats de formar part del nou Centre. Amb els fons del programa de Centres d’Excel·lència en Ciències Genòmiques (CEGS, per les seves sigles en anglès) de l’NHI, que rarament es concedeixen a grups de fora d’EUA, serem capaços de desenvolupar i innovar més els nostres mètodes computacionals per abordar l’excepcional repte de visualitzar el genoma humà complet en el seu entorn natural”, diu el professor d’investigació ICREA Marc A. Marti-Renom, i cap del grup de Genòmica Estructural amb afiliació conjunta al CNAG-CRG i el CRG.

Un millor comprensió de l’estructura, el mecanisme i la funció en detall del genoma humà pot esclarir misteris biològics sobre la funció genètica i revelar importants pistes sobre els orígens dels canvis genètics que causen les disfuncions i les malalties. Una compressió tan detallada comença amb la possibilitat de visualitzar el genoma complet en superresolució.

L’estructura del genoma és l’epicentre de tot, des de la formació adequada de l’esperma i l’òvul a la replicació, la divisió cel·lular, i el desenvolupament des de l’embrió a l’edat adulta. Cada cèl·lula sana conté una còpia materna i una paterna del genoma. La possibilitat d’observar com es pleguen i empaqueten durant aquests esdeveniments biològics, i com aquests processos poden torçar-se, podrien obrir noves vies per descobrir com sorgeixen certes malalties genètiques.

Les tecnologies actuals per observar el genoma en superresolució i de manera seqüencial i específica estan limitades perquè només poden observar pràcticament un grapat de gens o, com a molt, un mer 1 per cent del genoma alhora. Segons Wu, això és un problema perquè les respostes genòmiques a la malaltia o a pautes del desenvolupament, com les que es produeixen durant la formació de l’embrió i el desenvolupament, poden implicar de centenars a milers de gens dispersos per tot el genoma.

La superresolució pot revelar nous mons d’activitat al genoma. Per exemple, les imatges de superresolució poden desvelar com errors en la divisió cel·lular poden resultar en òvuls o esperma que contenen molt pocs o massa cromosomes, o causar danys cromosòmics, que poden provocar malalties genètiques o càncer.

Certs virus, especialment el VIH, infecten els humans inserint-se en fractures que creen al genoma. Les imatges de superresolució poden clarificar què succeeix a l’estructura de les regions genòmiques quan es fracturen i aplanar el camí a nous tractaments.

La superresolució també podria produir nous coneixements sobre seqüències repetitives d’ADN, les quals constitueixen prop de la meitat del genoma, tot i que el seu rol precís roman un mica tèrbol. El nombre, la disposició i l’empaquetament d’aquestes seqüències repetitives han estat relacionades amb les malalties genètiques, així que conèixer com estan organitzades podria ajudar els investigadors a conèixer millor els orígens moleculars d’aquestes malalties.

Cadascun dels grups de recerca en les quatres institucions participants ofereix una àrea d’especialització única i complementària, que va des de la genètica i la genòmica a la mecànica cromosòmica, la visualització per superresolució, i el modelatge tridimensional, entre d’altres.

Durant els darrers anys, els quatre laboratoris han estat desenvolupant tecnologies de visualització per superresolució i mètodes computacionals, tals com l’OligoFISSEQ, un nou mètode per a cartografiar genomes descrit per Marti-Renom i Wu l’any passat a Nature Methods (enllaç a la notícia del CRG de l’any passat sobre el mètode). L’objectiu últim és visualitzar el genoma humà complet a superresolució.

Sobre el CNAG-CRG

El Centre Nacional d’Anàlisi Genòmica és un dels centres europeus més grans en termes de capacitat de seqüenciació. Es creà al 2009 amb la missió de dur a terme projectes sobre l’anàlisi d’àcid nucleic en col·laboració amb la comunitat científica nacional i internacional. És una organització sense ànim de lucre finançada pel Ministeri de Ciència i Innovació, i la Generalitat de Catalunya a través del Departament de Recerca i Universitats i el Departament de Salut. Des del 2015 és part del Centre de Regulació Genòmica.

El centre s’enfoca en projectes de seqüenciació i anàlisi en àrees com la genètica del càncer, les malalties rares, interaccions hoste-patogen, l’assemblatge de novo i l’anotació genòmica, estudis evolutius i millora d’espècies d’interès agrícola, en col·laboració amb universitats, hospitals, centres de recerca i empreses del sector biotecnològic i farmacèutic.

Sobre el Centre de Regulació Genòmica (CRG)

El CRG és un centre de recerca biomèdica ubicat a Barcelona. Creat al desembre de 2000, el CRG acull a un equip científic interdisciplinari de més de quatre-centes persones centrades en la comprensió de la complexitat de la vida, des del genoma a la cèl·lula i a un organisme complet. El CRG és un centre amb un model de recerca únic, focalitzat en reclutar internacionalment caps de grup de prestigi. El CRG és membre del Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST) y és un centre CERCA del sistema de recerca de la Generalitat de Catalunya.

Finançament

El finançament procedeix del programa Centers of Excellence in Genomic Science (CEGS), que dóna suport a la formació d’equips de recerca interdisciplinaris i amb múltiples investigadors per desenvolupar projectes de recerca genòmica nous i innovadors, emprant els conjunts de dades i les tecnologies desenvolupades pel Projecte Genoma Humà. El programa CEGS està gestionat per l’National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI, per les seves sigles en anglès), que és part dels Instituts Nacionals de Salut d’EUA (NIH). La llista dels ajuts concedits pel CEGS pot consultar-se aquí, inclosa més informació sobre el Centre per a la Visualització del Genoma.