You are here

    • You are here:
    • Home > Europe looks to cells for a healthier future

Europe looks to cells for a healthier future

NEWS

16
Jan
Wed, 16/01/2019 - 11:45

Europe looks to cells for a healthier future

Researchers at CNAG-CRG take part in the LifeTime consortium, which aims at understanding the constant changes within cells and their relationship to disease

EN ESPAÑOL - EN CATALÀ

The body’s cells are constantly changing. But which of these changes are healthy developments and which lead to serious diseases? This is what LifeTime, a transnational and interdisciplinary initiative of leading European researchers, wants to figure out. The consortium, which includes researchers at the Centro Nacional de Análisis Genómico (CNAG-CRG) of the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona, is jointly coordinated by the Max Delbrück Center in Berlin and the Institut Curie in Paris. It has now cleared an important hurdle: LifeTime will receive one million euros to devise a plan how to embed its vision into the European research and innovation landscape.

How can signs of disease be detected as early as possible at the cellular level so as to quickly prevent disease progression through appropriate treatment? The European Union is now investing a million euros over a one-year period in devising the plan for a fundamentally new approach to understanding the constant changes within cells and their relationships to one another, thus creating the foundation for the precision medicine of the future. The funds will go to the international LifeTime consortium, which is jointly coordinated by the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) and the Institut Curie. Two researchers at the Centro Nacional de Análisis Genómico (CNAG-CRG) of the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) are involved in the project: Marc Marti-Renom, ICREA research professor, leader of the Structural Genomics group and co-chair of the Computational Biology workpackage of the LifeTime initiative and Holger Heyn, who has recently joined the consortium and leads the Single-Cell Genomics team at CNAG-CRG. 

More than 120 scientists at 53 institutions in 18 European countries are supporting the LifeTime consortium, as are more than 60 partners from industry. The European Union will concurrently fund the preparation of five other potential research initiatives. After the first year of funding, it will be up to the European Union to decide if any of them will be continued as a large-scale research initiative.

Precise therapeutic strategies

If a 58-year-old woman is diagnosed with a heart attack, there is currently only one option. Physicians will use a cardiac catheter to look for obstructed or narrowed blood vessels and then treat her according to textbook protocols. The procedure might look different in the future: Physicians first take a tiny sample at the site of the heart attack. They then sequence the RNA which is expressed there by the DNA in individual cells, thereby identifying the cell aggregates that have become inflamed and that can either heal the aftereffects of the heart attack or cause additional damage. What is crucial here is the development of innovative technologies that enable scientists to not only analyze cell populations, but also study individual cells in detail. Data gathered this way can be used by physicians to design precise therapeutic strategies.

This vision of precision medicine cannot be realized by only gathering human behavioral data from smartphones and wearable microcomputers – so-called wearables. Instead, it requires an understanding of how individual cells in the body change over time. That is because cells are not static components, but rather dynamic units that undergo constant transformation. They develop and multiply, form tissues with numerous other cells, acquire new characteristics, or simply age. Such change can be a normal development or lay the foundation for disease. Cells are especially prone to change over the course of the disease process.

Single-cell biology, organoids, and AI

LifeTime’s research teams combine cutting-edge technologies within the project and thus significantly push forward their development in Europe. For example, miniature organs grown in the petri dish – so-called organoids – and other innovative system such as new single-cell biology techniques play a crucial role here. The organoids derived from patients’ stem cells enable the development of personalized disease models. Combined with the genome editing tool CRISPR-Cas, drugs as well as state-of-the-art microscopy, and other models they will help scientists understand how cells stay healthy or progress towards disease and react to therapeutics.

The experiments – performed using high-throughput methods – generate huge amounts of data. Machine learning and artificial intelligence are therefore required for the analysis. The computational strategies identify patterns in the transformation of cells and can, for example, predict the onset of a disease or how a disease will progress. Together with mathematical models that enable the reconstruction of the cells’ past development, it is thus possible to infer how healthy cells become unhealthy cells. The scientists are also searching for central controls that can reverse or even completely prevent disease-causing changes.

The proposed groundbreaking initiative brings together not only researchers from the fields of biology, physics, computer science, mathematics, and medicine, but also experts from disciplines such as sociology, ethics, and economics. A public consultation will be undertaken to engage citizens and identify their concerns early in the project. It is anticipated that the LifeTime initiative will significantly impact the pharma, biotech, and data processing industries, as well as other sectors, while also positively influencing Europe’s competitiveness.

The proposed transnational initiative is supported by more than 60 companies and by major European research organizations such as the Helmholtz Association in Germany, the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) in France, the Wellcome Trust in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO), and the EU-LIFE Alliance, as well as by national science academies. “LifeTime is an outstanding project of European pioneers. This interdisciplinary and international cooperation has the potential to raise health research, and thus medical care to a new level. Therefore, we are very pleased that the EU is financing the LifeTime consortium. LifeTime is in the best sense: research for people," says Otmar D. Wiestler, President of the Helmholtz Association.

A European vision

The consortium will be receiving EU funding for one year to prepare a detailed plan for a ten-year research initiative. “This is a huge opportunity,” says Professor Nikolaus Rajewsky, who heads the MDC’s Berlin Institute for Medical Systems Biology (BIMSB), a hot spot for single-cell analyses. He is one of the two coordinators of the research consortium. “All of LifeTime’s members are among the best in their respective fields. They are doing visionary work. We are going to use this year to intensify our collaboration, share our vision and extend our network within Europe and beyond.” A launch conference will be held in Berlin from May 6 to 7, 2019, where the consortium’s members will introduce the initiative and provide information on how LifeTime plans to strengthen life sciences and healthcare in Europe.

The exact diseases the LifeTime initiative will focus on have yet to be selected. Refining the choice of disease will be a priority and will take into account a multitude of factors: “Europe’s citizens face a wide variety of medical conditions. During the first year, part of the plan is to determine which diseases are most amenable to our emerging technologies and models,” says Geneviève Almouzni, co-coordinator of the project and Director of Research at the CNRS and director of the Research Center of the Institut Curie from 2013 to 2018. “We will do this with the aid of citizens, health professionals and policy makers. The diseases could include cancers but also heart diseases, nervous system disorders, or other diseases.”

“LifeTime will bring genomics closer to the day-to-day clinics” says Marc A. Marti-Renom, ICREA research professor and group leader of the Structural Genomics laboratory at CNAG-CRG in Spain and co-chair of the Computational Biology workpackage of the initiative. “This can only be done with the concerted effort at European level of researchers covering almost all science and technology disciplines. We have now a year to show we can work together”.

 

International consortium

LifeTime is the shared vision of more than 120 leading scientists at over 50 renowned organizations across Europe, who selected 18 partners to submit the proposal.

Helmholtz Association of German Research CentresFrench National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS)Institute of Molecular Biotechnology (IMBA) • Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences • Vlaams Instituut voor Biotechnologie (VIB) Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research (FMI) • University of Basel • University of Zurich • Central European Institute of Technology • Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics • Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics • German Cancer Research Center • Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine • German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases • Helmholtz Zentrum München • Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology • Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research • Saarland University • Technical University of Munich • Julius-Maximilians-Universität • Biotech Research & Innovation Centre (Copenhagen) • Aarhus University • University of Copenhagen • Centre for Genomic Regulation (Barcelona) • French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm) • Institut Curie • University of Montpellier • University of Toulouse III – Paul Sabatier • MINES ParisTech • Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland • Biomedical Research Foundation of the Academy of Athens • Weizmann Institute of Science • Hebrew University of Jerusalem • Sapienza University of Rome • National Institute of Molecular Genetics (Milan) • University of Naples Federico II • University of Padua • University of Milan • European Institute of Oncology • Netherlands Cancer Institute • Radboud University • University Medical Center Utrecht • Hubrecht Institute/Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences • Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência • Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences Iuliu Haţieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy Cluj-NapocaKarolinska Institutet • MRC Human Genetics Unit • University of Edinburgh • Wellcome Sanger Institute • Babraham InstituteEuropean Molecular Biology Laboratory – European Bioinformatics Institute • The Francis Crick Institute

 

Further information

The LifeTime initiative

LifeTime – a visionary proposal for an EU Flagship

EU Flagship initiative for visionary scientific projects

Launch conference website

Nikolaus Rajewsky Lab

Geneviève Almouzni’s Team

Cell by cell to the breakthrough of the year

 

Media relations contact:
Laia Cendrós, press office, Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) - Tel. +34 93 316 0237.

 


EN ESPAÑOL

Europa pone la mirada en las células para un futuro más saludable

Los investigadores del Centro Nacional de Análisis Genómico (CNAG-CRG) del Centro de Regulación Genómica (CRG) participan en el consorcio LifeTime, cuyo objetivo es comprender los cambios constantes dentro de las células y su relación con las enfermedades.

Las células del cuerpo están cambiando constantemente. ¿Pero cuáles de estos cambios son desarrollos saludables y cuáles conducen a enfermedades graves? Esto es lo que LifeTime, una iniciativa transnacional e interdisciplinaria de destacados investigadores europeos, quiere descubrir. El consorcio, que incluye investigadores del Centro Nacional de Análisis Genómico (CNAG-CRG) del Centro de Regulación Genómica (CRG) en Barcelona, ​​está coordinado conjuntamente por el Centro Max Delbrück en Berlín y el Instituto Curie en París. La iniciativa LifeTime acaba de superar un obstáculo importante: recibirá un millón de euros para diseñar un plan sobre cómo integrar su visión en el panorama europeo de la investigación y la innovación.

¿Cómo pueden detectarse los signos de la enfermedad lo antes posible a nivel celular para prevenir rápidamente la progresión de la enfermedad a través del tratamiento adecuado? La Unión Europea invierte ahora un millón de euros para diseñar, en un año, el plan de un enfoque nuevo para comprender los cambios constantes dentro de las células y sus relaciones entre sí, creando así las bases para la medicina de precisión del futuro. Los fondos se destinarán al consorcio internacional LifeTime, coordinado conjuntamente por el Centro Max Delbrück de Medicina Molecular (MDC) y el Institut Curie. Dos investigadores del Centro Nacional de Análisis Genómico (CNAG-CRG) del Centro de Regulación Genómica (CRG) están implicados en el proyecto: Marc Marti-Renom, profesor de investigación ICREA, jefe del grupo Genómica Estructural y co-líder del grupo de trabajo de biología computacional en la iniciativa LifeTime y Holger Heyn, quien se ha unido al consorcio recientemente y lidera el equipo Single-Cell Genomics del CNAG-CRG.

Más de 120 científicos de 53 instituciones en 18 países europeos apoyan al consorcio LifeTime, al igual que más de 60 socios de la industria. La Unión Europea financiará simultáneamente la preparación de otras cinco posibles iniciativas de investigación. Después del primer año de financiamiento, la Unión Europea decidirá si alguno de ellos continuará como una iniciativa de investigación a gran escala.

Estrategias terapéuticas precisas

Si a una mujer de 58 años se le diagnostica un ataque al corazón, actualmente solo hay una opción. Los médicos usarán un catéter cardíaco para buscar vasos sanguíneos obstruidos o estrechados y luego la tratarán de acuerdo con los protocolos de los libros de texto. El procedimiento puede parecer diferente en el futuro: los médicos primero toman una pequeña muestra en el lugar del ataque al corazón. Luego secuencian el ARN que se expresa allí por el ADN en células individuales, identificando así los agregados celulares que se han inflamado y que pueden curar los efectos secundarios del ataque cardíaco o causar daño adicional. Lo que es crucial aquí es el desarrollo de tecnologías innovadoras que permitan a los científicos no solo analizar las poblaciones celulares, sino también estudiar las células individuales en detalle. Los médicos pueden utilizar los datos recopilados de esta manera para diseñar estrategias terapéuticas precisas.

Esta visión de la medicina de precisión no se puede realizar solo mediante la recopilación de datos sobre el comportamiento humano de los teléfonos inteligentes o dispositivos portátiles. En  cambio, requiere una comprensión de cómo las células individuales en el cuerpo cambian con el tiempo. Esto se debe a que las células no son componentes estáticos, sino unidades dinámicas en constante transformación. Se desarrollan y se multiplican, forman tejidos con muchas otras células, adquieren nuevas características o simplemente envejecen. Cada cambio puede ser un desarrollo normal o sentar las bases de una enfermedad. Las células son especialmente propensas a cambiar a lo largo del proceso de la enfermedad.

Biología de células individuales, organoides e inteligencia artificial

Los equipos de investigación de LifeTime combinan tecnologías de vanguardia dentro del proyecto y, por lo tanto, impulsan significativamente su desarrollo en Europa. Por ejemplo, los órganos en miniatura que crecen en una placa de Petri, los llamados organoides, y otros sistemas innovadores, como las nuevas técnicas de biología de células individiuales, desempeñan un papel crucial aquí. Los organoides derivados de las células madre de los pacientes permiten el desarrollo de modelos personalizados de enfermedades. Combinados con la herramienta de edición del genoma CRISPR-Cas, los medicamentos, la microscopía de vanguardia y otros modelos, ayudarán a los científicos a comprender cómo las células se mantienen saludables o progresan hacia la enfermedad y reaccionan a los tratamientos terapéuticos.

Los experimentos, realizados con métodos de alto rendimiento, generan enormes cantidades de datos. Por lo tanto, el aprendizaje automático y la inteligencia artificial son necesarios para el análisis. Las estrategias computacionales identifican patrones en la transformación de las células y pueden, por ejemplo, predecir la aparición de una enfermedad o cómo progresará una enfermedad. Junto con los modelos matemáticos que permiten la reconstrucción del desarrollo anterior de las células, es posible inferir cómo las células sanas se convierten en células enfermas. Los científicos también están buscando controles centrales que puedan revertir o incluso prevenir completamente los cambios que causan enfermedades.

Esta innovadora iniciativa reúne no solo a investigadores de los campos de la biología, la física, la informática, las matemáticas y la medicina, sino también a expertos de disciplinas como la sociología, la ética y la economía. Se realizará una consulta pública para involucrar a los ciudadanos e identificar sus inquietudes al inicio del proyecto. Se anticipa que la iniciativa LifeTime también tendrá un impacto significativo en las industrias farmacéutica, biotecnológica y de procesamiento de datos, así como en otros sectores, a la vez que influye positivamente en la competitividad de Europa.

La iniciativa transnacional propuesta cuenta con el apoyo de más de 60 empresas y de las principales organizaciones de investigación europeas, como la Asociación Helmholtz en Alemania, el Centro Nacional de Investigación Científica (CNRS) en Francia, el Wellcome Trust en el Reino Unido, la Organización de los Países Bajos para la Investigación Científica (NWO), y la Alianza EU-LIFE, así como por academias nacionales de ciencia. “LifeTime es un destacado proyecto de pioneros europeos. Esta cooperación interdisciplinaria e internacional tiene el potencial de elevar la investigación en salud y, en consecuencia la atención médica, a un nuevo nivel. Por lo tanto, nos complace que la UE esté financiando el consorcio LifeTime. LifeTime es en el mejor sentido: investigación para las personas", dice Otmar D. Wiestler, presidente de la Asociación Helmholtz.

Una vision europea

El consorcio recibirá fondos de la UE durante un año para preparar un plan detallado para una iniciativa de investigación de diez años. "Esta es una gran oportunidad", dice el profesor Nikolaus Rajewsky, quien dirige el Instituto de Berlín para la Biología de Sistemas Médicos del MDC y un referente en el análisis de células individuales. "Todos los miembros de LifeTime están entre los mejores en sus respectivos campos. Están haciendo un trabajo visionario. Vamos a utilizar este año para intensificar nuestra colaboración, compartir nuestra visión y ampliar nuestra red dentro de Europa y más allá". Se celebrará una conferencia de lanzamiento en Berlín del 6 al 7 de mayo de 2019, donde los miembros del consorcio presentarán la iniciativa y proporcionar información sobre cómo LifeTime planea fortalecer las ciencias de la vida y la asistencia sanitaria en Europa”.

Las enfermedades exactas en las que se centrará la iniciativa LifeTime aún no se han seleccionado. Refinar la elección de la enfermedad será una prioridad y tendrá en cuenta una multitud de factores: "Los ciudadanos de Europa se enfrentan a una amplia variedad de afecciones médicas. Durante el primer año, parte del plan es determinar qué enfermedades son más susceptibles a nuestras tecnologías y modelos emergentes", dice Geneviève Almouzni, co-coordinadora del proyecto, director de Investigación en el CNRS y director del Centro de Investigación del Institut Curie desde 2013 hasta 2018. "Haremos esto con la ayuda de ciudadanos, profesionales de la salud y responsables políticos. Las enfermedades pueden incluir diversos tipos de cáncer, pero también enfermedades cardíacas, trastornos del sistema nervioso u otras enfermedades ".

"LifeTime acercará la genómica a las clínicas del día a día", dice Marc A. Marti-Renom, profesor de investigación ICREA y jefe del grupo Genómica estructural en el CNAG-CRG en España y co-líder del grupo de trabajo de Biología Computacional de la iniciativa LifeTime. “Algo así sólo puede llevarse a cabo con el esfuerzo concertado a nivel europeo de investigadores que cubren casi todas las disciplinas de ciencia y tecnología. Tenemos un año para demostrar que podemos trabajar juntos”.

Consorcio internacional

LifeTime es la visión compartida de más de 120 científicos líderes en más de 50 organizaciones reconocidas en toda Europa, que seleccionaron a 18 socios para enviar la propuesta.

Helmholtz Association of German Research CentresFrench National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS)Institute of Molecular Biotechnology (IMBA) • Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences • Vlaams Instituut voor Biotechnologie (VIB) Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research (FMI) • University of Basel • University of Zurich • Central European Institute of Technology • Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics • Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics • German Cancer Research Center • Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine • German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases • Helmholtz Zentrum München • Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology • Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research • Saarland University • Technical University of Munich • Julius-Maximilians-Universität • Biotech Research & Innovation Centre (Copenhagen) • Aarhus University • University of Copenhagen • Centre for Genomic Regulation (Barcelona) • French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm) • Institut Curie • University of Montpellier • University of Toulouse III – Paul Sabatier • MINES ParisTech • Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland • Biomedical Research Foundation of the Academy of Athens • Weizmann Institute of Science • Hebrew University of Jerusalem • Sapienza University of Rome • National Institute of Molecular Genetics (Milan) • University of Naples Federico II • University of Padua • University of Milan • European Institute of Oncology • Netherlands Cancer Institute • Radboud University • University Medical Center Utrecht • Hubrecht Institute/Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences • Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência • Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences Iuliu Haţieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy Cluj-NapocaKarolinska Institutet • MRC Human Genetics Unit • University of Edinburgh • Wellcome Sanger Institute • Babraham InstituteEuropean Molecular Biology Laboratory – European Bioinformatics Institute • The Francis Crick Institute

 

Más información

The LifeTime initiative

LifeTime – a visionary proposal for an EU Flagship

EU Flagship initiative for visionary scientific projects

Launch conference website

Nikolaus Rajewsky Lab

Geneviève Almouzni’s Team

Cell by cell to the breakthrough of the year

 

Contacto para medios
Laia Cendrós - Oficina de prensa - Centro de Regulación Genómica (CRG) - Tel. +34 93 316 0237

 


EN CATALÀ

Europa posa la mirada en les cèl·lules per a un futur més saludable

Els investigadors del Centre Nacional d'Anàlisi Genòmica (CNAG-CRG) del Centre de Regulació Genòmica (CRG) participen en el consorci LifeTime, l'objectiu del qual és comprendre els canvis constants dins de les cèl·lules i la seva relació amb les malalties.

Les cèl·lules del cos estan canviant constantment. Però quins d'aquests canvis són desenvolupaments saludables i quins condueixen a malalties greus? Això és el que LifeTime, una iniciativa transnacional i interdisciplinària de destacats investigadors europeus, vol descobrir. El consorci, que inclou investigadors del Centre Nacional d'Anàlisi Genòmica (CNAG-CRG) del Centre de Regulació Genòmica (CRG) a Barcelona, ​​està coordinat conjuntament pel Centre Max Delbrück a Berlín i l'Institut Curie a París. La iniciativa LifeTime acaba de superar un obstacle important: rebrà un milió d'euros per dissenyar un pla sobre com integrar la seva visió en el panorama europeu de la recerca i la innovació.

Com poden detectar els signes de la malaltia com més aviat millor a nivell cel·lular per prevenir ràpidament la progressió de la malaltia a través del tractament adequat? La Unió Europea inverteix ara un milió d'euros per a dissenyar, en un any, el pla d'un nou enfocament per a comprendre els canvis constants dins de les cèl·lules i les seves relacions entre si, creant així les bases per a la medicina de precisió del futur. Els fons es destinaran al consorci internacional LifeTime, coordinat conjuntament pel Centre Max Delbrück de Medicina Molecular (MDC) i l'Institut Curie. Dos investigadors del Centre Nacional d'Anàlisi Genòmica (CNAG-CRG) del Centro de Regulació Genòmica (CRG) estan implicats en el projecte: Marc A. Marti-Renom, professor d'investigació ICREA, cap del grup Genòmica Estructural i co-líder del grup de treball de biologia computacional en la iniciativa LifeTime, i Holger Heyn, qui s'ha unit al consorci recentement i lidera l'equipo Single-Cell Genomics del CNAG-CRG. 

Més de 120 científics de 53 institucions en 18 països europeus donen suport al consorci LifeTime, igual que més de 60 socis de la indústria. La Unió Europea finançarà simultàniament la preparació d'altres cinc possibles iniciatives d'investigació. Després del primer any de finançament, la Unió Europea decidirà si algun d'ells continuarà com una iniciativa de recerca a gran escala.

Estratègies terapèutiques necessàries

Si a una dona de 58 anys se li diagnostica un atac de cor, actualment només hi ha una opció. Els metges faran servir un catèter cardíac per buscar vasos sanguinis obstruïts o estrets i després la tractaran d'acord amb els protocols dels llibres de text. El procediment podria semblar diferent en el futur: els metges primer prenen una petita mostra al lloc de l'atac de cor. Després seqüencien l'ARN que s'expressa allà per l'ADN en cada cèl·lula individuals, identificant així els agregats cel·lulars que s'han inflamat i que poden curar els efectes secundaris de l'atac cardíac o causar dany addicional. El que és crucial aquí és el desenvolupament de tecnologies innovadores que permetin als científics no només analitzar les poblacions cel·lulars, sinó també estudiar les cèl·lules individuals en detall. Els metges poden utilitzar les dades recopilades d'aquesta manera per dissenyar estratègies terapèutiques precises.

Aquesta visió de la medicina de precisió no es pot fer només mitjançant la recopilació de dades sobre el comportament humà dels telèfons intel·ligents o dispositius portàtils. En canvi, requereix una comprensió de com les cèl·lules individuals en el cos canvien amb el temps. Això es deu al fet que les cèl·lules no són components estàtics, sinó unitats dinàmiques en constant transformació. Es desenvolupen i es multipliquen, formen teixits amb moltes altres cèl·lules, adquireixen noves característiques o simplement envelleixen. Cada canvi pot ser un desenvolupament normal o establir les bases d'una malaltia. Les cèl·lules són especialment propenses a canviar al llarg del procés de la malaltia.

Biologia de cèl·lules individuals, organoides i intel·ligència artificial

Els equips de recerca de LifeTime combinen tecnologies d'avantguarda dins del projecte i, per tant, impulsen significativament el seu desenvolupament a Europa. Per exemple, els òrgans en miniatura que creixen en una placa de Petri, els anomenats organoides, i altres sistemes innovadors, com les noves tècniques de biologia de cèl·lules individiuals, exerceixen un paper crucial aquí. Els organoides derivats de les cèl·lules mare dels pacients permeten el desenvolupament de models personalitzats de malalties. Combinats amb l'eina d'edició del genoma CRISPR-Cas, els medicaments, la microscòpia d'avantguarda i altres models, ajudaran als científics a comprendre com les cèl·lules es mantenen saludables o progressen cap a la malaltia i reaccionen als tractaments terapèutics.

Els experiments, realitzats amb mètodes d'alt rendiment, generen enormes quantitats de dades. Per tant, l'aprenentatge automàtic i la intel·ligència artificial són necessaris per a l'anàlisi. Les estratègies computacionals identifiquen patrons en la transformació de les cèl·lules i poden, per exemple, predir l'aparició d'una malaltia o com progressarà una malaltia. Juntament amb els models matemàtics que permeten la reconstrucció del desenvolupament anterior de les cèl·lules, és possible inferir com les cèl·lules sanes es converteixen en cèl·lules malaltes. Els científics també estan buscant controls centrals que puguin revertir o fins i tot prevenir completament els canvis que causen malalties.

Aquesta innovadora iniciativa reuneix no només a investigadors dels camps de la biologia, la física, la informàtica, les matemàtiques i la medicina, sinó també a experts de disciplines com la sociologia, l'ètica i l'economia. Es realitzarà una consulta pública per involucrar els ciutadans i identificar les seves inquietuds a l'inici del projecte. S'anticipa que la iniciativa LifeTime també tindrà un impacte significatiu en les indústries farmacèutica, biotecnològica i de processament de dades, així com en altres sectors, alhora que influeix positivament en la competitivitat d'Europa.

La iniciativa transnacional proposta compta amb el suport de més de 60 empreses i de les principals organitzacions de recerca europees, com l'Associació Helmholtz a Alemanya, el Centre Nacional d'Investigació Científica (CNRS) a França, el Wellcome Trust al Regne Unit, la organització dels Països Baixos per a la Investigació Científica (NWO), i l'Aliança EU-LIFE, així com per acadèmies nacionals de ciència. "LifeTime és un destacat projecte de pioners europeus. Aquesta cooperació interdisciplinària i internacional té el potencial d'elevar la investigació en salut i, en conseqüència l'atenció mèdica, a un nou nivell. Per tant, ens complau que la UE estigui finançant el consorci LifeTime. LifeTime és en el millor sentit: investigació per a les persones", diu Otmar D. Wiestler, president de l'Associació Helmholtz.

Una visió europea

El consorci rebrà fons de la UE durant un any per preparar un pla detallat per a una iniciativa d'investigació de deu anys. "Aquesta és una gran oportunitat", diu el professor Nikolaus Rajewsky, qui dirigeix ​​l'Institut de Berlín per la Biologia de Sistemes Mèdics de l’MDC i un referent en l'anàlisi de cèl·lules individuals. "Tots els membres de LifeTime estan entre els millors en els seus respectius camps. Estan fent un treball visionari. Utilitzarem aquest any per intensificar la nostra col·laboració, compartir la nostra visió i ampliar la nostra xarxa dins d'Europa i més enllà". Se celebrarà una conferència de llançament a Berlín del 6 al 7 de maig de 2019, on els membres del consorci han de presentar la iniciativa i proporcionar informació sobre com LifeTime planeja enfortir les ciències de la vida i l'assistència sanitària a Europa ".

Les malalties exactes en què se centrarà la iniciativa LifeTime encara no s'han seleccionat. Refinar l'elecció de la malaltia serà una prioritat i tindrà en compte una multitud de factors: "Els ciutadans d'Europa s'enfronten a una àmplia varietat d'afeccions mèdiques. Durant el primer any, part del pla és determinar quines malalties són més susceptibles a les nostres tecnologies i models emergents", diu Geneviève Almouzni, co-coordinadora del projecte, directora de Recerca al CNRS i directora del Centre de Recerca de l'Institut Curie des de 2013 fins a 2018. “Farem això amb l'ajuda de ciutadans, professionals de la salut i responsables polítics. Les malalties poden incloure diversos tipus de càncer, però també malalties cardíaques, trastorns del sistema nerviós o altres malalties".

“LifeTime acostarà la genòmica a les clíniques del dia a dia", diu Marc A. Marti-Renom, professor d'investigació ICREA i cap del grup Genòmica Estructural al CNAG-CRG a Espanya i co-líder del grup de treball de Biologia Computacional de la iniciativa LifeTime. "Una cosa així només es pot dur a terme amb l'esforç concertat a nivell europeu d'investigadors que cobreixen gairebé totes les disciplines de ciència i tecnologia. Tenim un any per demostrar que podem treballar junts ".

Consorci internacional

LifeTime és la visió compartida de més de 120 científics líders en més de 50 organitzacions reconegudes a tot Europa, que van seleccionar a 18 socis per enviar la proposta.

Helmholtz Association of German Research CentresFrench National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS)Institute of Molecular Biotechnology (IMBA) • Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences • Vlaams Instituut voor Biotechnologie (VIB) Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research (FMI) • University of Basel • University of Zurich • Central European Institute of Technology • Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics • Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics • German Cancer Research Center • Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine • German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases • Helmholtz Zentrum München • Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology • Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research • Saarland University • Technical University of Munich • Julius-Maximilians-Universität • Biotech Research & Innovation Centre (Copenhagen) • Aarhus University • University of Copenhagen • Centre for Genomic Regulation (Barcelona) • French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm) • Institut Curie • University of Montpellier • University of Toulouse III – Paul Sabatier • MINES ParisTech • Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland • Biomedical Research Foundation of the Academy of Athens • Weizmann Institute of Science • Hebrew University of Jerusalem • Sapienza University of Rome • National Institute of Molecular Genetics (Milan) • University of Naples Federico II • University of Padua • University of Milan • European Institute of Oncology • Netherlands Cancer Institute • Radboud University • University Medical Center Utrecht • Hubrecht Institute/Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences • Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência • Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences Iuliu Haţieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy Cluj-NapocaKarolinska Institutet • MRC Human Genetics Unit • University of Edinburgh • Wellcome Sanger Institute • Babraham InstituteEuropean Molecular Biology Laboratory – European Bioinformatics Institute • The Francis Crick Institute

 

Més informació

The LifeTime initiative

LifeTime – a visionary proposal for an EU Flagship

EU Flagship initiative for visionary scientific projects

Launch conference website

Nikolaus Rajewsky Lab

Geneviève Almouzni’s Team

Cell by cell to the breakthrough of the year

 

Contacte per a mitjans
Laia Cendrós
- Oficina de premsa - Centre de Regulació Genòmica (CRG) - Tel. +34 93 316 0237.