You are here

    • You are here:
    • Home > Citizen science reveals first comprehensive snapshot of the oral microbiome

Citizen science reveals first comprehensive snapshot of the oral microbiome

NewsNEWS

19
May
Thu, 19/05/2022 - 09:29

Citizen science reveals first comprehensive snapshot of the oral microbiome

Biological or lifestyle factors that left a signature mark on the oral microbiome. The snapshot for each factor provides a rulebook to help interpret the language of the oral microbiome in such a way that saliva sampling may one day be as routine as blood or urine testing.

  • The scientific team behind ‘Saca la Lengua’ have today published the first study that portrays how oral microbiome diversity changes with age. The results, obtained by researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), with the support of the ”la Caixa” Foundation, have been published in npj Biofilms and Microbiomes.
  • The study includes 1,648 people between 7 and 85 years of age distributed throughout Spain, providing "a dictionary that helps interpret the language of the oral microbiome". The findings pave the way so that in the future a saliva test is as informative and routinely used as carrying out a blood test
  • The study reveals that certain environmental and social traits influence the composition of the oral microbiome. Living members of the same family share a similar oral microbiome composition, a trend also found for the first time amongst classmates at school
  • The results also reveal which factors are more decisive when it comes to influencing the oral microbiota, including chronic diseases such as cystic fibrosis or lifestyle habits such as smoking. The data will serve to build a computational model to interpret the information provided by saliva, and to predict changes induced by different environmental and physiological factors

Oral microbiome diversity changes significantly with age, according to the results of a new study published today in the scientific journal npj Biofilms and Microbiomes, developed by the scientific team of 'Saca la Lengua' at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) and directed by Dr. Toni Gabaldón with the support of the ”la Caixa” Foundation.

The study of 1,648 people between 7 and 85 years of age located all over Spain, reveals a parabolic trend that results in three distinct stages for the composition of microorganisms living in the mouth.

According to the authors of the study, teenagers have a highly biodiverse oral microbiome that varies greatly between individuals, which may be explained by hormonal and behavioural changes. Middle-aged people had lower biodiversity as well as a generally homogeneous composition between individuals, representing a stage of high stability. From the age of 60, biodiversity and the differences between individuals increased considerably.

Researchers believe that the high diversity of the oral microbiome in elderly people could be due to the establishment of rare opportunistic species, almost all of which are linked to oral diseases such as periodontitis. The authors hypothesise that the difference between middle and old ages may be due to differences in the immune system, which weakens with age, making the oral cavity more susceptible to colonization by opportunistic species that would otherwise normally not succeed.

In order to understand the environmental and/or lifestyle characteristics that influence the oral microbiome, study participants completed a questionnaire that examined 80 different aspects of lifestyle habits, diet, hygiene and health.

Factors associated with major changes in the oral microbiome were found to be linked to chronic diseases such as cystic fibrosis or conditions such as Down syndrome, followed by lifestyle habits such as smoking. Each of these factors changed the microbiome in a particular way, resulting in a specific signal. People with celiac disease, hypertension or those that used antibiotics also changed their oral microbiome in specific ways, although to a lesser extent than other factors.

The impact of social and family relationships also influenced the composition of the oral microbiome. Members of the same family – for example, parents and children, or two brothers or sisters – have a more similar microbiome compared to two people from different families. The association exists even among members of the same class in school, a finding that leads the authors to hypothesise that sharing the same environment, even for a few hours a day, can significantly affect the oral microbiome.

The results, which are the first study of changes in the diversity of the oral microbiome with age, could speed the development of techniques that use saliva to report on people's health status.

“Oral health is connected to the entire human body. For this reason, saliva contains a lot of useful information that can provide complementary information to other tests such as blood tests. The results of 'Saca la Lengua' provide a dictionary that helps interpret the language of the oral microbiome in such a way that, one day, using a saliva sample could be as routine as blood or urine tests,” says ICREA Research Professor Toni Gabaldón, Scientific Lead of the 'Saca la Lengua' project, and currently Group Leader with dual affiliation at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) and the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC-CNS).

The study has found that people with chronic diseases such as cystic fibrosis or conditions such as Down syndrome have a different and specific oral microbiome related to the specific characteristics in people living with these conditions. The researchers found a higher presence of periodontitis-associated species in people with Down syndrome and a higher presence of opportunistic airway pathogens in people with cystic fibrosis. The knowledge paves the way for specific treatments that reduce risks associated to these findings, for example through the use of customised pre- or probiotics.

'Saca la Lengua' is a citizen science project promoted by the Centre for Genomic Regulation and the ”la Caixa” Foundation which aimed to discover the variety of microorganisms that live in our mouths. The first edition of the project was launched in 2015 with the aim of determining the link between the oral microbiome and environmental and/or lifestyle habits among teenagers.

The second edition of 'Saca la Lengua' was launched in 2017 with the aim of expanding the first snapshot of the oral microbiome with data from other age groups or from patients with certain diseases such as celiac disease, fibrosis cystic, or conditions such as Down syndrome.

The team visited more than 30 educational and community centres in various cities across Spain. The team equipped a van with the necessary equipment to process the saliva samples and travelled more than 7,000 kilometres between Barcelona, ​​the Balearic Islands, the Valencian Community, Murcia, Andalusia, Madrid, Galicia, the Basque Country and Aragon.

"This was conceived from the beginning as a participatory project, in which citizens could contribute not only with their saliva but their minds, by telling us what questions we should explore and what data to analyse as a priority," says Dr. Elisabetta Broglio, Citizen Science Coordinator at the CRG. “We involved as many people as possible by visiting patient associations, bars, museums, schools, community centres and adult educational centres. Without the massive participation we got it would have been impossible to obtain the results at this scale.”

"The first edition of 'Saca la Lengua' was a resounding success. That's why we launched it a second time, to further advance our understanding of the microbiome. When we conceived the idea we could not predict the success of the project both at the citizen science level and at the scientific level. It is an example of an innovative project in which citizens have played an essential role”, says Dr. Luis Serrano, Director of the CRG.

The 'Saca la Lengua' project was supported by Illumina, Eppendorf, miniPCR, and ThermoFisher Scientific. The Genomics and Bioinformatics services of the CRG, key in the development of the project, are co-financed by the European Union through the European Regional Development Funds (ERDF).
 


EN CASTELLANO

La ciencia ciudadana desvela el primer retrato exhaustivo del microbioma oral

  • El equipo científico de ‘Saca la Lengua’ publica hoy el primer estudio mundial que retrata cómo cambia la diversidad del microbioma oral con la edad. Los resultados, obtenidos por un equipo científico del Centro de Regulación Genómica (CRG), con el apoyo de la Fundación ”la Caixa”, se han publicado en la revista científica npj Biofilms and Microbiomes.
  • El estudio incluye 1.648 personas, de entre 7 y 85 años de edad, repartidas por todo el territorio español, y proporciona «un diccionario que ayuda a interpretar el lenguaje del microbioma oral», un hito que allana el camino para que en un futuro un análisis de saliva sea tan informativo y rutinario como las analíticas de sangre
  • Ciertas características ambientales y sociales influyen en la composición del microbioma oral. Miembros convivientes de la misma familia tienen una composición del microbioma oral parecida, una tendencia también hallada por primera vez entre compañeros de clase escolar.
  • Los resultados también revelan qué factores son más determinantes a la hora de influir en la microbiota oral, entre los que se encuentran enfermedades crónicas como la fibrosis quística o estilos de vida como fumar. Esta información servirá para construir un modelo computacional para interpretar la información proporcionada por la saliva, y que permita predecir cambios inducidos por distintos factores ambientales y fisiológicos.

La diversidad del microbioma oral cambia de manera significativa con la edad, según los resultados de un nuevo estudio publicado hoy en la revista científica npj Biofilms and Microbiomes, desarrollado por el equipo científico de ‘Saca la Lengua’ del Centro de Regulación Genómica (CRG), dirigido por el Dr. Toni Gabaldón, con el apoyo de la Fundación ”la Caixa”.

El estudio de 1.648 personas, de entre 7 y 85 años de edad, repartidas por todo el territorio español, revela la existencia de una tendencia parabólica que resulta en tres etapas distintas en la composición de microorganismos residentes en la boca.

Según los autores del estudio, los adolescentes tienen un microbioma oral muy biodiverso y que varía mucho entre personas, lo que quizás esté relacionado con cambios hormonales y de hábitos durante esta fase. Las personas de mediana edad tienen una biodiversidad más baja y además una composición más homogénea entre personas, representando una etapa de alta estabilidad. A partir de los 60 años, la biodiversidad y las diferencias entre personas aumentan de nuevo y de manera muy considerable.

Los autores del estudio se percataron de que la alta diversidad del microbioma oral en personas de edad avanzada era la causa del establecimiento de especies oportunistas raras, casi todas vinculadas a enfermedades orales como la periodontitis. Los autores postulan que la diferencia entre la edad media y avanzada puede deberse a diferencias en el sistema inmune, que al debilitarse con la edad hace que la cavidad bucal sea más susceptible a la colonización de especies oportunistas que serían normalmente rechazadas.

Con el objetivo de entender las características ambientales y/o de estilo de vida que influyen en el microbioma oral, los participantes del estudio rellenaron un cuestionario que examina 80 aspectos diferentes sobre el estilo de vida, la dieta, la higiene y la salud.

Los factores asociados a cambios importantes en el microbioma oral están vinculados a enfermedades crónicas como la fibrosis quística o en síndromes como el síndrome de Down, seguidos por los de estilo de vida como fumar. Cada uno de estos factores cambió el microbioma de una manera particular, resultando en una señal específica. También influyeron, aunque en menor medida, la celiaquía, la hipertensión o el uso de antibióticos.

El impacto de las relaciones sociales y familiares también influye sobre la composición del microbioma oral. Miembros de la misma familia – por ejemplo, padres e hijos, o dos hermanos o hermanas – tienen un microbioma más parecido que entre dos personas de diferentes familias. La asociación existe incluso entre los miembros de la misma clase escolar, un hallazgo que hace que los autores postulen que compartir el mismo entorno, aunque sea unas horas al día, puede afectar significativamente al microbioma oral.

Los resultados, que son el primer estudio de los cambios de la diversidad del microbioma oral con la edad, podrían acelerar el desarrollo de técnicas que usen la saliva para informar sobre el estado de salud de las personas.

«La salud bucal está conectada con todo el cuerpo humano. Por esta razón, la saliva contiene mucha información útil que puede proporcionar información complementaria a otras analíticas como las de sangre. Los resultados de ‘Saca la Lengua’ proporcionan un diccionario que ayuda a interpretar el lenguaje del microbioma oral de tal manera que, puede que un día, la muestra de saliva sea tan rutinaria como los análisis de sangre u orina» afirma el Profesor de Investigación ICREA Toni Gabaldón, responsable científico del proyecto ‘Saca la Lengua’, y actualmente jefe de grupo en el Instituto de Investigación Biomédica (IRB Barcelona) y el Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC-CNS).

El estudio ha descubierto que las personas con enfermedades crónicas como la fibrosis quística o en síndromes como el síndrome de Down tienen un microbioma oral diferente y característico. Las diferencias encontradas tienen relación con problemas específicos en estas personas. Por ejemplo, una mayor presencia de especies asociadas a periodontitis en personas con síndrome de Down, y una mayor presencia de patógenos oportunistas de las vías respiratorias en personas con fibrosis quística. Un mayor conocimiento del microbioma oral en estas personas allana el camino para tratamientos específicos que reduzcan estos riesgos, y que podrían consistir en pre- o probióticos específicamente diseñados con este fin.

‘Saca la Lengua’ es un proyecto de ciencia ciudadana impulsado por el Centro de Regulación Genómica y la Fundación ”la Caixa” que tenía como objetivo descubrir la variedad de microorganismos que viven en nuestra boca. La primera edición del proyecto fue lanzada en 2015 con el objetivo de determinar la relación del microbioma oral con las características ambientales y/o de estilo de vida entre adolescentes.

Tras el éxito del primer proyecto, en 2017 se lanzó la segunda edición de ‘Saca la Lengua’ con el objetivo de ampliar el primer retrato del microbioma oral con datos de otros grupos de edad o de pacientes de ciertas enfermedades como la celiaquía, la fibrosis quística, o en síndromes como el síndrome de Down.

El equipo científico de ‘Saca la Lengua’ visitó más de 30 centros educativos y centros cívicos en varias ciudades del territorio español. El equipo habilitó una furgoneta con los equipos necesarios para el procesamiento inicial de las muestras de saliva, recorriendo más de 7.000 kilómetros entre Barcelona, las Islas Baleares, la Comunidad Valenciana, Murcia, Andalucía, Madrid, Galicia, País Vasco y Aragón.

«Este se planteó desde un principio como un proyecto participativo, en el que la ciudadanía podía contribuir no solo con una muestra de saliva, sino también con las preguntas que debíamos explorar y la priorización de los datos a analizar» afirma la Dra. Elisabetta Broglio, Coordinadora de Ciencia Ciudadana en el CRG. «Entre asociaciones de pacientes, bares, museos, escuelas, centros cívicos y aulas de la tercera edad, todos se volcaron para formar parte del estudio. Sin esta participación masiva hubiera sido imposible conseguir unos resultados con este nivel de resolución.»

«La primera edición de ‘Saca la Lengua’ fue un éxito rotundo. Por eso lanzamos una segunda edición, para avanzar aún más nuestro conocimiento del microbioma. Cuando concebimos la idea no pudimos predecir el éxito del proyecto tanto a nivel de ciencia ciudadana como a nivel científico. Es un ejemplo de proyecto innovador en el que la ciudadanía ha tenido un papel esencial» afirma Dr. Luis Serrano, Director del CRG.

El proyecto 'Saca la Lengua' cuenta con el apoyo y la contribución de las empresas Illumina, Eppendorf, miniPCR, y ThermoFisher Scientific. Los servicios de Genómica y Bioinformática del CRG, claves en el desarrollo del proyecto, están cofinanciados por la Unión Europea a través de los Fondos Europeos de Desarrollo Regional (FEDER).
 


EN CATALÀ

La ciència ciutadana revela el primer retrat exhaustiu del microbioma oral

  • L’ equip científic de ‘Saca la Lengua’ publica avui el primer estudi mundial que retrata com canvia la diversitat del microbioma oral amb l’edat. Els resultats, obtinguts per un equip científic del Centre de Regulació Genòmica (CRG), amb el suport de la Fundació “la Caixa”, s’han publicat a la revista científica npj Biofilms and Microbiomes.
  • L’estudi inclou 1.648 persones, d’entre 7 i 85 anys d’edat, repartides per tot el territori espanyol, i proporciona «un diccionari que ajuda a interpretar el llenguatge del microbioma oral», una fita que aplana el camí per a què en un futur una anàlisi de saliva sigui tan informativa i rutinària com les analítiques de sang.
  • Certes característiques ambientals i socials influeixen en la composició del microbioma oral. Membres convivents de la mateixa família tenen una composició del microbioma oral semblant, una tendència també trobada per primer cop entre companys de classe escolar.
  • Els resultats també revelen quins factors són més determinants a l’hora d’influir en la microbiota oral, entre els quals es troben malalties cròniques com la fibrosi quística i estils de vida com fumar. Aquesta informació servirà per a construir un model computacional per a interpretar la informació proporcionada per la saliva, i que permeti predir canvis induïts per distints factors ambientals i fisiològics.

La diversitat del microbioma oral canvia de manera significativa amb l’edat, segons els resultats d’un nou estudi publicat avui a la revista científica npj Biofilms and Microbiomes, desenvolupat per l’equip científic de ‘Saca la Lengua’ del Centre de Regulació Genòmica (CRG), dirigit pel Dr. Toni Gabaldón, amb el suport de la Fundació “la Caixa”.

L’estudi de 1.648 persones, d’entre 7 i 85 anys d’edat, repartides per tot el territori espanyol, revela l’existència d’una tendència parabòlica que resulta en tres etapes distintes en la composició de microorganismes residents a la boca.

Segons els autors de l’estudi, els adolescents tenen un microbioma oral molt divers i que varia molt entre persones, fet que potser estigui relacionat amb canvis hormonals i d’hàbits durant aquesta fase. Les persones de mitjana edat tenen una diversitat més baixa i, a més, una composició més homogènia entre persones, representant una etapa d’alta estabilitat. A partir dels 60 anys, la biodiversitat i les diferències entre persones augmenten de nou i de manera molt considerable.

Els autors de l’estudi s’adonaren que l’alta diversitat del microbioma oral en persones d’edat avançada era la causa de l’establiment d’espècies oportunistes rares, gairebé totes vinculades a malalties orals com la periodontitis. Els autors postulen que la diferència entre l’edat mitjana i avançada pot ésser conseqüència de diferències en el sistema immunitari, que en debilitar-se amb l’edat fa que la cavitat bucal sigui més susceptible a la colonització d’espècies oportunistes que serien normalment rebutjades.

Amb l’objectiu de comprendre les característiques ambientals i/o d’estil de vida que influeixen en el microbioma oral, els participants de l’estudi ompliren un qüestionari que examina 80 aspectes diferents sobre l’estil de vida, la dieta, la higiene i la salut.

Els factors associats a canvis importants en el microbioma oral estan vinculats a malalties cròniques com la fibrosi quística o síndromes com la síndrome de Down, seguits pels estils de vida com ara fumar. Cadascun d’aquests factors canvià el microbioma d’una manera particular, resultant en un senyal específic. També influïren, tot i que en menor mesura, la celiaquia, la hipertensió i l’ús d’antibiòtics.

L’impacte de les relacions socials i familiars també influeix sobre la composició del microbioma oral. Membres de la mateixa família –per exemple, pares i fills, dos germans o germanes- tenen un microbioma més semblant que entre dues persones de diferents famílies. L’associació existeix fins i tot entre els membres de la mateixa classe escolar, una troballa que fa que els autors postulin que compartir el mateix entorn, tot i que sigui unes hores al dia, pot afectar significativament al microbioma oral.

Els resultats, que són el primer estudi dels canvis de la diversitat del microbioma oral amb l’edat, podrien accelerar el desenvolupament de tècniques que emprin la saliva per a informar sobre l’estat de salut de les persones.

«La salut bucal està connectada amb tot el cos humà. Per aquesta raó, la saliva conté molta informació útil que pot proporcional informació complementària a d’altres analítiques com les de sang. Els resultats de ‘Saca la Lengua’ proporcionen un diccionari que ajuda a interpretar el llenguatge del microbioma oral de tal manera que, potser algun dia, la mostra de saliva sigui tan rutinària com les anàlisis de sang o orina» afirma el Professor d’Investigació ICREA Toni Gabaldón, responsable científic del projecte ‘Saca la Lengua’, i actualment cap de grup a l’Institut de Recerca Biomèdica (IRB Barcelona) i el Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC-CNS).

L’estudi ha descobert que les persones amb malalties cròniques com la fibrosi quística o amb síndromes com la síndrome de Down tenen un microbioma oral diferent i característic. Les diferències trobades tenen relació amb problemes específics en aquestes persones. Per exemple, una major presència d’espècies associades a periodontitis en persones amb síndrome de Down, i una major presència de patògens oportunistes a les vies respiratòries en persones amb fibrosi quística. Un coneixement més ampli del microbioma oral en aquestes persones aplana el camí per a tractaments específics que redueixin aquests riscos, i que podrien consistir en pre- o probiòtics específicament dissenyats amb aquest objectiu.

‘Saca la Lengua’ és un projecte de ciència ciutadana impulsat pel Centre de Regulació Genòmica i la Fundació “la Caixa” que tenia com a objectiu descobrir la varietat de microorganismes que viuen a la nostra boca. La primera edició del projecte es va llançar el 2015 amb l’objectiu de determinar la relació del microbioma oral amb d’altres característiques ambientals i/o d’estil de vida entre adolescents.

Després de l’èxit del primer projecte, al 2017 es llançà la segona edició de ‘Saca la Lengua’ amb l’objectiu d’ampliar el primer retrat del microbioma oral amb dades d’altres grups d’edat o de pacients de certes malalties, com ara la celiaquia, la fibrosi quística, o amb síndromes com la síndrome de Down.

L’equip científic de ‘Saca la Lengua’ visità més de 30 centres educatius i centres cívics en diverses ciutats del territori espanyol. L’equip habilità una furgoneta amb els equips necessaris per al processament inicial de les mostres de saliva, recorrent més de 7.000 quilòmetres entre Barcelona, les Illes Balears, la Comunitat Valenciana, Murcia, Andalusia, Madrid, Galícia, País Basc i Aragó.

«Es va plantejar des del principi com a un projecte participatiu, en què la ciutadania podia contribuir no només amb una mostra de saliva, sinó també amb les preguntes que havíem d’explorar i la priorització de les dades que s’havien d’analitzar» afirma la Dra. Elisabetta Broglio, Coordinadora de Ciència Ciutadana al CRG. «Entre associacions de pacients, bars, museus, escoles, centres cívics i aules de la tercera edat, tothom es volcà per formar part de l’estudi. Sense aquesta participació massiva hagués estat impossible aconseguir uns resultats amb aquest nivell de resolució.»

«La primera edició de ‘Saca la Lengua’ fou un èxit rotund. Per això vam llançar una segona edició, per avançar encara més el nostre coneixement del microbioma. Quan vam concebre la idea no vam poder predir l’èxit del projecte, tant a nivell de ciència ciutadana, com a nivell científic. És un exemple de projecte innovador en què la ciutadania ha tingut un paper essencial» afirma el Dr. Luis Serrano, Director del CRG.

El projecte ‘Saca la Lengua’ compta amb el suport i la contribució de les empreses Illumina, Eppendorf, miniPCR i ThermoFisher Scientific. Els serveis de Genòmica i Bioinformàtica del CRG, claus en el desenvolupament del projecte, estan cofinançats per la Unió Europea a través dels Fons Europeus de Desenvolupament Regional (FEDER).