Se encuentra usted aquí

    • You are here:
    • Inicio > Small but ubiquitous sex differences in gene expression in human tissues linked to body fat, cancer, and birth weight

Small but ubiquitous sex differences in gene expression in human tissues linked to body fat, cancer, and birth weight

Small but ubiquitous sex differences in gene expression in human tissues linked to body fat, cancer, and birth weight

10
Sep
Jue, 10/09/2020 - 20:00

Small but ubiquitous sex differences in gene expression in human tissues linked to body fat, cancer, and birth weight

Group picture of the Roderic Guigó's lab at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG).

EN ESPAÑOL - EN CATALÀ

A study published today in Science reveals that biological sex has a small but ubiquitous influence on gene expression in almost every type of human tissue. Genes found to be expressed at different levels in adult males and females are involved in many different biological processes, including response to medication, control of blood sugar level in pregnancy, and cancer. 

The study is part of a set of papers (4 in Science, 1 in Cell and 8 in other journals) published by the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) Consortium, which are the culmination of a 10-year-effort funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). GTEx project is an ongoing international effort to build a comprehensive public resource to study tissue-specific gene expression and regulation.

Sex has a weaker but important effect on the genetic contribution to gene regulation, with the researchers discovering previously unreported links between genes and complex traits, including birth weight and percentage of body fat. Therefore, these discoveries suggest the importance of considering sex as a biological variable in human genetics and genomics studies. If specific genes or genetic variants contribute differentially to a given trait in males and females, it could suggest sex-specific (or differentiated) biomarkers, therapeutics, drug dosing, etc. In the future, such knowledge may form a critical component of personalized medicine or may reveal disease biology that remains obscured when considering males and females as a single group.

Sex differences have been previously attributed to hormones, sex chromosomes, and differences in behavior and environmental exposures, but the molecular mechanisms and underlying biology remain largely unknown. 

In this study lead by Barbara E. Stranger from the University of Chicago, and Northwestern University, both in Illinois, researchers from the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), in the group of Roderic Guigó, the Sant Pau Biomedical Research Institute-IIB Sant Pau, led by José Manuel Soria, the University of Barcelona, and other centers world-wide, investigated sex differences in the transcriptome, which is the sum of all RNA transcripts in a cell, across 44 types of healthy human tissue from 838 individuals.

“Our work is a catalog of sex-differentiated effects across the human transcriptome that can serve as a reference when performing further analyses to explore the role of sex in biology,” says Manuel Muñoz Aguirre, first co-author and researcher at the Centre for Genomic Regulation. “We believe this work can be helpful for researchers seeking to assess sex biases in disease, which could ultimately translate into clinical practice.”

José Manuel Soria, co-author of the article and head of the Genomics of Complex Diseases Unit at Institut de Recerca de l’Hospital de Sant Pau – IIB Sant Pau, adds: "The implications of our study in Biomedicine are enormous. We must bear in mind that the risk suffering from complex diseases (such as osteoporosis, endocrine diseases or stroke, among others), with an important genetic basis, is different between men and women. We also respond differentially to drugs if you are a man or a woman. Thanks to our study we have a genetic expression map that will allow us to know which genetic factors are responsible for these differential traits between sexes. This information will be essential to establish prediction models of diseases or response to drugs that affect men and women differentially, which will improve its prevention, diagnosis and treatment in a personalized way (Personalized Medicine)”.

Sex differences in gene expression were reported in at least one type of tissue for over a third of all human genes (37%). Although abundant, the sex effects on gene expression were mostly small. The number of sex-biased genes and their effect sizes were not dominated by either sex.

Sex-biased genes represented diverse molecular and biological functions, including genes relevant to disease and clinical phenotypes, many of which had not been previously associated with sex differences at a molecular level. For example, the gene CYP450, linked to human drug metabolism in liver, was found to be sex-differentially expressed across multiple tissues. Genes targeted by the H3K27me3 epigenetic mark, linked to sex-biased secretion of pituitary growth hormone and placental development, were also sex-differentially expressed across multiple tissues. 

The researchers also studied the genetic regulation of gene expression. Here they found much less of an impact of sex, with the majority of discovered effects observed in breast tissue, followed by muscle, skin and adipose tissue. When cross-referencing this data with results from 87 GWAS studies representing 74 different complex traits, the researchers found 58 gene-trait links that would have been missed with sex-agnostic analyses, highlighting the importance of considering sex as a biological variable in genomic analyses.

“These results suggest that sex differences in human complex traits might derive, in part, from sex differences in gene regulation. In the future, this knowledge may contribute to personalized medicine, where we consider biological sex as one of the relevant components of an individual’s characteristics”, declares Barbara E. Stranger, main author of the study at Northwestern University, Chicago.

In women, the genetic regulation of CCDC88 is strongly associated with the progression of breast cancer, and HKDC1 with birth weight, possibly by altering glucose metabolism in the liver of a pregnant woman. In men, genetic regulation of DPYSL4 was associated with body fat percentage and CLDN7 with birth weight. The researchers also identified a link between an uncharacterized gene, C9orf66, and male pattern balding.

“Our study reveals gene-trait links that would have been missed with sex-agnostic analyses, highlighting the importance of considering sex as a biological variable in genomic analyses. In a forthcoming future, we anticipate that novel, sex-aware single cell transcriptome approaches may play an important role in disentangling sex effects on the transcriptome even further”, says Meritxell Oliva, first co-author of the study at The University of Chicago, and former researcher at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), in Barcelona.

Importantly, the researchers note that despite the discovery of extensive sex differences at the transcriptome level, these effects were small and the male and female distributions overlapped. Indeed, they note that the majority of biology at all phenotype levels is shared between males and females. They also note that the study has several limitations. The findings are based on a snapshot of mostly older individuals. The analysis also does not account for sex differences that occur during different developmental stages, in specific environments, or in specific disease states.

The CRG authors of this paper also contributed to two other papers of the set published today by the GTEx Consortium. In the main GTEx paper published by the GTEx consortium, and another manuscript, cell type composition was identified as a key factor to understand gene regulatory mechanisms in human tissues. GTEx researchers found that the abundance of each cell type in human tissues is linked to specific genome traits. CRG researchers have contributed to these articles by testing statistical methods to identify the presence of specific cell types in tissues based on gene expression.

Reference: Oliva M, Muñoz-Aguirre M, …., Guigó R and Stranger BE. “The impact of sex on gene expression across human tissues.” Science 369, eaba3066 (2020). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aba3066

The GTEx Consortium. “The GTEx Consortium atlas of genetic regulatory effects across human tissues”. Science, Sep 11, 2020. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaz1776

Kim-Hellmuth et al. (including Muñoz-Aguirre M, Wucher V, Garrido-Martín D and Guigó R from CRG). “Cell type-specific genetic regulation of gene expression across human tissues”. Science 369, eaaz8528 (2020). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaz8528

Funding acknowledgements: This work was supported at the CRG by the Common Fund of the Office of the Director, U.S. National Institutes of Health, and by NCI, NHGRI, NHLBI, NIDA, NIMH, NIA, NIAID, and NINDS through NIH grant R01MH101814 (M.M-A., V.W., S.B.M., R.G., E.T.D., D.G-M., A.V.), Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad and FEDER funds (M.M A., V.W., R.G., D.G-M.), la Caixa Foundation ID 100010434 under agreement LCF/BQ/SO15/52260001 (D.G-M.), FPU15/03635, Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte (M.M-A.). All CRG authors acknowledge the support of the Spanish Ministry of Science, Innovation and Universities to the EMBL partnership, the Centro de Excelencia Severo Ochoa and the CERCA Programme / Generalitat de Catalunya.


ESPAÑOL

Pequeñas pero extendidas diferencias de sexo en la expresión génica en tejidos humanos vinculadas a la grasa corporal, al cáncer y al peso al nacer

Un estudio publicado hoy en la revista Science revela que el sexo biológico tiene una pequeña pero extendida influencia en la expresión génica de casi cada tipo de tejido humano. Los genes que se estima que deben expresarse a diferentes niveles en hombres y mujeres adultas están implicados en muchos procesos biológicos distintos, incluidos la respuesta a la medicación, el control de los niveles de glucosa en sangre durante el embarazo, y el cáncer.

El estudio es parte de un conjunto de artículos (4 en Science, 1 en Cell y 8 en otras revistas científicas) publicado por el Consorcio Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx), y suponen la culminación de un esfuerzo de 10 años financiado por los Institutos Nacionales de Salud (NIH) de EEUU. El proyecto GTEx es una iniciativa internacional cuyo objetivo es construir un repositorio público completo para estudiar la expresión de los genes y su regulación específica en tejidos.

El sexo tiene un efecto menor pero relevante en la contribución genética a la regulación génica. El equipo investigador ha descubierto conexiones que no se habían reportado con anterioridad entre genes y atributos complejos, incluidos el peso al nacer y el porcentaje de grasa corporal. Por ello, estos descubrimientos ponen de manifiesto la importancia de considerar el sexo como una variable biológica en la genética humana y los estudios genéticos. Si hay genes específicos o variantes genéticas que contribuyen diferencialmente a un atributo concreto en hombres y mujeres, podrían plantearse biomarcadores, terapias, dosis farmacológicas, etc., específicos para cada sexo (o diferenciados). En el futuro, este conocimiento puede convertirse en un componente crítico de la medicina personalizada o puede desvelar la biología de la enfermedad que subyace oculta cuando se considera a hombres y mujeres como un solo grupo.

Las diferencias sexuales han sido previamente atribuidas a hormonas, cromosomas sexuales, diferencias en el comportamiento y factores medioambientales, pero los mecanismos moleculares subyacentes de la biología son en gran parte desconocidos. 

En este estudio, liderado por Barbara E. Stranger de la Universidad de Chicago y la Northwestern University, ambas en Illinois, EEUU, un equipo científico del Centro de Regulación Genómica (CRG), en concreto del grupo de Roderic Guigó, y del Instituto de Investigación Biomédica Sant Pau-IIB Sant Pau, dirigido por José Manuel Soria, y la Universidad de Barcelona, y equipos de otros centros internacionales, investigaron las diferencias sexuales en el transcriptoma, que es la suma de todas las transcripciones de ARN de una célula, en 44 tipos de tejidos humanos sanos pertenecientes a 838 personas.

“Nuestro trabajo es un catálogo de efectos diferenciados por sexo en el transcriptoma humano que puede servir como referencia al realizar análisis más extensos para explorar el papel del sexo en la biología,” dice Manuel Muñoz-Aguirre, co-primer autor e investigador en el Centro de Regulación Genómica.“Creemos que este trabajo puede ser útil a otros equipos científicos que deseen evaluar sesgos de sexo en enfermedades, lo que finalmente podría trasladarse a la práctica clínica.”

José Manuel Soria, otro de los autores locales de este estudio y jefe de la Unidad de Genómica de Enfermedades Complejas en el Instituto de Investigación del Hospital de Sant Pau-IIB Sant Pau, añade: “Las implicaciones del estudio en biomedicina son enormes. Debemos tener en cuenta que el riesgo de sufrir enfermedades complejas (como osteoporosis, trastornos endocrinos o apoplejía, entre otros) con una importante base genética, es diferente entre hombres y mujeres. También respondemos de forma diferente a los fármacos. Gracias al estudio disponemos de un mapa de expresión génica que nos permitirá conocer qué factores genéticos son responsables para estos rasgos diferenciales entre sexos. Esta información será esencial para establecer modelos de predicción de enfermedades o la respuesta a fármacos que afectan a hombres y mujeres de forma diferente, lo que mejorará su prevención, diagnóstico y tratamiento de una manera personalizada (medicina personalizada)”.

Las diferencias de sexo en la expresión génica se reportan en al menos un tipo de tejido en alrededor de un tercio de todos los genes humanos (37%). A pesar de ser abundantes, los efectos sexuales en la expresión génica son mayoritariamente pequeños. El número de genes con sesgo sexual y sus efectos en el tamaño no están dominados por ningún sexo.

Los genes con sesgo sexual representan diversidad molecular y de funciones biológicas, incluidos genes relevantes para algunas enfermedades y fenotipos clínicos, muchos de los cuales no habían sido asociados previamente con diferencias sexuales a nivel molecular. Por ejemplo, se descubrió que el gen CYP450, asociado al metabolismo de los fármacos en humanos en el hígado, se expresaba de manera diferencial por sexo a lo largo de múltiples tejidos. Los genes diana del marcador epigenético H3K27me3, asociados a la secreción diferenciada por sexo de la hormona pituitaria de crecimiento y desarrollo placentario, también estaban expresados de manera diferencial por sexo en múltiples tejidos.

El equipo científico también estudió la regulación genética de la expresión génica. Aquí el sexo tenía mucho menos impacto, con la mayoría de efectos descubiertos observados en el tejido mamario, seguido del músculo, la piel y el tejido adiposo. Cuando realizaron referencias cruzadas de estos datos con resultados de 87 estudios de asociación del genoma (GWAS, en sus siglas en inglés) que representaban 74 atributos complejos diferentes, el equipo descubrió 58 asociaciones entre genes y atributos que se habrían perdido a través de análisis que no hubieran tenido en cuenta el sexo, lo que subraya la importancia de considerar el sexo como una variable biológica en análisis genómicos.

“Estos resultados sugieren que las diferencias de sexo en atributos humanos complejos podrían derivar, en parte, de las diferencias sexuales en la regulación génica. En el futuro, este conocimiento podría contribuir a la medicina personalizada, en la cual consideramos el sexo biológico como uno de los componentes relevantes de las características de una persona”, declara Barbara E. Stranger, autora principal del estudio en la Northwestern University, en Chicago, EEUU.

En las mujeres, la regulación genética de CCDC88 está fuertemente ligada con la progresión del cáncer de mama, y HKDC1 con el peso al nacer, posiblemente a través de la alteración del metabolismo de la glucosa en el hígado de una mujer embarazada. En los hombres, la regulación genética de DPYSL4 se asoció con el porcentaje de grasa corporal y CLDN7 con el peso al nacer. El equipo científico también identificó vínculos entre un gen sin caracterizar, C9orf66, y el patrón de pérdida de cabello en hombres. 

“Nuestro estudio revela vínculos entre genes y atributos que se habrían perdido a través de otros análisis que no hubieran tenido en cuenta el factor sexual, lo que subraya la importancia de considerar el sexo como una variable biológica en los análisis genómicos. En un futuro venidero, creemos que los métodos basados en el transcriptoma de células únicas, innovadores y que tengan en cuenta el sexo, pueden tener un papel importante para desenmarañar los efectos del sexo en el transcriptoma de forma más extensa,” dice Meritxell Oliva, co-primera autora del estudio en la Universidad de Chicago, EEUU, y antigua miembro del Centro de Regulación Genómica.

Es importante destacar que el equipo investigador pone de manifiesto que a pesar del descubrimiento de amplias diferencias sexuales al nivel del transcriptoma, estos efectos son muy pequeños y su distribución entre hombres y mujeres se solapaba. De hecho, destacan que la mayor parte de la biología a todos los niveles fenotípicos entre hombres y mujeres es compartida. También destacan que el estudio tiene diversas limitaciones. Los descubrimientos se basan en una instantánea de mayoritariamente personas mayores. En los análisis tampoco se han considerado diferencias sexuales que suceden durante estadios del desarrollo, en situaciones ambientales específicas, o en estados de enfermedad específicos.

Los autores del CRG de este estudio también han contribuido a otros dos estudios del conjunto de artículos publicado por el Consorcio GTEx. En el artículo principal publicado por el Consorcio GTEx, y en otro manuscrito, la composición del tipo celular se identificó como un factor clave para comprender los mecanismos regulatorios de los genes en los tejidos humanos. También descubrieron que la abundancia de cada tipo celular en tejidos humanos está asociada a rasgos específicos del genoma. El equipo científico del CRG ha contribuido a estos artículos mediante el testeo de métodos estadísticos para identificar la presencia de tipos celulares específicos en tejidos basándose en la expresión génica.

Referencia: Oliva M, Muñoz-Aguirre M, …., Guigó R and Stranger BE. “The impact of sex on gene expression across human tissues.” Science 369, eaba3066 (2020). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aba3066

The GTEx Consortium. “The GTEx Consortium atlas of genetic regulatory effects across human tissues”. Science, Sep 11, 2020. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaz1776

Kim-Hellmuth et al. (including Muñoz-Aguirre M, Wucher V, Garrido-Martín D and Guigó R from CRG). “Cell type-specific genetic regulation of gene expression across human tissues”. Science 369, eaaz8528 (2020). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaz8528

Financiación: Para este estudio, el CRG ha recibido el apoyo del Common Fund of the Office of the Director, U.S. National Institutes of Health, y del NCI, NHGRI, NHLBI, NIDA, NIMH, NIA, NIAID, y NINDS a través de la ayuda R01MH101814 (M.M-A., V.W., S.B.M., R.G., E.T.D., D.G-M., A.V.), Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad y fondos FEDER (M.M A., V.W., R.G., D.G-M.), la Fundación la Caixa ID 100010434 bajo el acuerdo LCF/BQ/SO15/52260001 (D.G-M.), FPU15/03635, Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte (M.M-A.). Todos los autores del CRG reconocen el apoyo del Ministerio de Ciencia, Innovación y Universidades al EMBL partnership, el Centro de Excelencia Severo Ochoa y el Programa CERCA / Generalitat de Catalunya.


CATALÀ

Petites però esteses diferències de sexe en l’expressió gènica en teixits humans vinculades al greix corporal, el càncer i al pes en néixer 

Un estudi publicat avui a la revista Science revela que el sexe biològic té una petita però estesa influència en l’expressió gènica de gairebé cada tipus de teixit humà. Els gens que s’estima que han d’expressar-se a diferents nivells en homes i dones adultes estan implicats en molts processos biològics distints, inclosos la resposta a la medicació, el control dels nivells de glucosa en sang durant l’embaràs, i el càncer.

L’estudi és part d’un conjunt d’articles (4 a Science, 1 a Cell i 8 en d’altres revistes científiques) publicat pel Consorci Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx), i suposen la culminació d’un esforç de 10 anys finançat pels Instituts Nacionals de Salut (NIH) d’EUA. El projecte GTEx és una iniciativa internacional l’objectiu de la qual és construir un repositori públic complet per a estudiar l’expressió dels gens i la seva regulació específica en teixits.

El sexe té un efecte menor però rellevant en la contribució genètica a la regulació gènica. L’equip investigador ha descobert connexions que no s’havien reportat amb anterioritat entre gens i atributs complexes, inclosos el pes en néixer i el percentatge de greix corporal. Per això, aquests descobriments posen de manifest la importància de considerar el sexe com a una variant biològica en la genètica humana i els estudis genètics. Si hi ha gens específics o variants genètiques que contribueixen diferencialment a un atribut concret en homes i dones, podrien plantejar-se biomarcardors, teràpies, dosis farmacològiques, etc., específics per a cada sexe (o diferenciats). En el futur, aquest coneixement pot convertir-se en un component crític de la medicina personalitzada o pot desvetllar la biologia subjacent de la malaltia que roman oculta quan es considera a homes i dones com a un sol grup.

Les diferències sexuals han estat prèviament atribuïdes a hormones, cromosomes sexuals, diferències en el comportament i factors mediambientals, però els mecanismes moleculars subjacents de la biologia són en gran part desconeguts.

En aquest estudi, liderat per Barbara E. Stranger de la Universitat de Chicago i la Northwestern University, ambdues a Illinois, EUA, un equip científic del Centre de Regulació Genòmica (CRG), en concret del grup de Roderic Guigó, i de l’Institut de Recerca Biomèdica de Sant Pau-IIB Sant Pau, dirigit per en José Manuel Soria, i la Universitat de Barcelona, i equips d’altres centres internacionals, investigaren les diferències sexuals en el transcriptoma, que és la suma de totes de totes les transcripcions d’ARN d’una cèl·lula, en 44 tipus de teixits humans sans pertanyents a 838 persones.

“El nostre treball és un catàleg d’efectes diferenciats per sexe al transcriptoma humà que pot servir com a referència al realitzar anàlisis més extenses per explorar el paper del sexe en la biologia,” diu Manuel Muñoz-Aguirre, co-primer autor i investigador al Centre de Regulació Genòmica. “Creiem que aquest treball pot ser útil a d’altres equips científics que desitgin avaluar biaixos de sexe en malalties, el que finalment podria traslladar-se a la pràctica clínica.”

José Manuel Soria, un altre dels autors locals d’aquest estudi i cap de la Unitat de Genòmica de Malalties Complexes a l’Institut de Recerca de l’Hospital de Sant Pau-IIB Sant Pau, afegeix: “Les implicacions de l’estudi en biomedicina són enormes. Hem de tenir en compte que el risc de patir malalties complexes (com ara osteoporosis, trastorns endocrins o apoplexia, entre d’altres) amb una important base genètica, es diferent entre homes y dones. També responem de forma distinta als fàrmacs. Gràcies a l’estudi disposem d’un mapa d’expressió gènica que ens permetrà conèixer quins factors genètics són responsables per a aquests trets diferencials entre sexes. Aquesta informació serà essencial per a establir models de predicció de malalties o la resposta a fàrmacs que afecten a homes i dones de manera diferent i això millorarà la prevenció, el diagnòstic i el tractament d’una forma personalitzada (medicina personalitzada)”.

Les diferències de sexe en l’expressió gènica es reporten en almenys un tipus de teixit en aproximadament un terç de tots els gens humans (37%). Tot i ésser abundants, els efectes sexuals en l’expressió gènica són majoritàriament petits. El nombre de gens amb biaix sexual i els seus efectes en les dimensions no estan dominats per cap sexe.

Els gens amb biaix sexual representen diversitat molecular i de funcions biològiques, inclosos gens rellevants per a algunes malalties i fenotips clínics, molts dels quals no havien estat associats prèviament amb diferències sexuals a nivell molecular. Per exemple, es descobrí que el gen CYP450, associat al metabolisme dels fàrmacs en humans al fetge, s’expressava de manera diferencial per sexe al llarg de múltiples teixits. Els gens diana del marcador epigenètic H3K27me3, associats a la secreció diferenciada per sexe de la hormona pituïtària de creixement i desenvolupament placentari, també estaven expressats de manera diferencial per sexe en múltiples teixits.

L’equip científic també estudià la regulació genètica de l’expressió gènica. Aquí el sexe tenia molt menys impacte, amb la majoria d’efectes descoberts observats al teixit mamari, seguit del muscle, la pell i el teixit adipós. Quan realitzaren referències creuades d’aquestes dades amb resultats de 87 estudis d’associació del genoma (GWAS, en les sigles en anglès) que representaven 74 atributs complexos diferents, l’equip descobrí 58 associacions entre gens i atributs que s’haurien perdut a través d’anàlisis que no haguessin tingut en compte el sexe, el que subratlla la importància de considerar el sexe com a una variable biològica en anàlisis genòmiques.

“Aquests resultats suggereixen que les diferències de sexe en atributs humans complexes podrien derivar, en part, de les diferències sexuals en la regulació gènica. En el futur, aquest coneixement podria contribuir a la medicina personalitzada, en la qual considerem el sexe biològic com a un dels components rellevants de les característiques d’una persona”, declara Barbara E. Stranger, autora principal de l’estudi a la Northwestern University, a Chicago, EUA.

En les dones, la regulació genètica de CCDC88 està fortament lligada a la progressió del càncer de mama, i HKDC1 amb el pes en néixer, possiblement a través de l’alteració del metabolisme de la glucosa en el fetge d’una dona embarassada. En els homes, la regulació genètica de DPYSL4 s’associà amb el percentatge de greix corporal i CLDN7 amb el pes en néixer. L’equip científic també identificà vincles entre un gen sense caracteritzar, C9orf66, i el patró de pèrdua de cabell en homes.

“El nostre estudi revela vincles entres gens i atributs que s’haurien perdut a través d’altres anàlisis que no haguessin tingut en compte el factor sexual, el que subratlla la importància de considerar el sexe com a una variable biològica en les anàlisis genòmiques. En un futur proper, creiem que els mètodes basats en el transcriptoma de cèl·lules úniques, innovadors, i que tinguin en compte el sexe, poden tenir un paper important per a descabdellar els efectes del sexe en el transcriptoma de manera més extensa,” diu Mertixell Oliva, co-primera autora de l’estudi a la Universitat de Chicago, EUA, i antiga investigadora del Centre de Regulació Genòmica.

És important destacar que l’equip investigador posa de manifest que tot i el descobriment d’àmplies diferències sexuals a nivell del transcriptoma, aquests efectes són molt petits i la seva distribució entre homes i dones se solapava. De fet, destaquen que la major part de la biologia a tots els nivells fenotípics entre homes i dones és compartida. També destaquen que l’estudi té diverses limitacions. Els descobriments es basen en una instantània de majoritàriament persones grans. A les anàlisis tampoc s’han considerat diferències sexuals que es produeixen en estadis del desenvolupament, en situacions ambientals específiques, o en estats de malaltia específics.

Els autors del CRG d’aquest estudi també han contribuït a d’altres dos estudis del conjunt d’articles publicats pel Consorsi GTEx. En l’article principal publicat pel Consorci GTEx, i en un altre manuscrit, la composició del tipus cel·lular s’identificà com a un factor clau per a comprendre els mecanismes de regulació dels gens en els teixits humans. També descobriren que l’abundància de cada tipus cel·lular en teixits humans està associada a trets específics del genoma. L’equip científic del CRG ha contribuït a aquests articles mitjançant la prova de mètodes estadístics per a identificar la presència de tipus cel·lulars específics en teixits basant-se en l’expressió gènica. 

Referència: Oliva M, Muñoz-Aguirre M, …., Guigó R and Stranger BE. “The impact of sex on gene expression across human tissues.” Science 369, eaba3066 (2020). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aba3066

The GTEx Consortium. “The GTEx Consortium atlas of genetic regulatory effects across human tissues”. Science, Sep 11, 2020. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaz1776

Kim-Hellmuth et al. (including Muñoz-Aguirre M, Wucher V, Garrido-Martín D and Guigó R from CRG). “Cell type-specific genetic regulation of gene expression across human tissues”. Science 369, eaaz8528 (2020). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaz8528

Finançament: Per a aquest estudi, el CRG ha rebut el suport del Common Fund of the Office of the Director, U.S. National Institutes of Health, i de l’NCI, NHGRI, NHLBI, NIDA, NIMH, NIA, NIAID, i NINDS a través de l’ajut R01MH101814 (M.M-A., V.W., S.B.M., R.G., E.T.D., D.G-M., A.V.), Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad i fons FEDER (M.M A., V.W., R.G., D.G-M.), la Fundació la Caixa ID 100010434 sota l’acord LCF/BQ/SO15/52260001 (D.G-M.), FPU15/03635, Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte (M.M-A.). Tots els autors del CRG reconeixen el suport del Ministerio de Ciencia, Innovación y Universidades a l’EMBL partnership, el Centro de Excelencia Severo Ochoa i el Programa CERCA / Generalitat de Catalunya.